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Understanding Rosacea — Diagnosis and Treatment



    For many people, rosacea causes more than just facial flushing and redness. Symptoms of the skin condition may also include acne-like bumps, eye irritation, and thickened skin, according to the National Rosacea Society. Although there is no consensus about what causes rosacea, treatments are improving. To decrease redness, try these rosacea skin-care tips.

    1. Know Your Triggers for Flares and Try to Avoid Them

    Spicy food, alcohol, sun exposure, extreme heat or cold, stress, and even your skin-care products may trigger a rosacea flare, according to the National Rosacea Society. What are your triggers? Keep a journal or make mental notes to determine what may be causing your rosacea symptoms, says Michele Green, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City. You can avoid some triggers, though you may have trouble sidestepping certain other ones. If you do experience a flare, you can minimize your symptoms by taking a cool shower or gently cleaning your face with rosacea skin-care products. “Just don’t scrub, as this will make things worse,” Dr. Green cautions.

    RELATED: What to Eat and Avoid to Reduce Rosacea Flares

    2. Moisturize, Moisturize, Moisturize to Manage Rosacea

    Moisturizer is an essential skin-care product for rosacea. Amy Forman Taub, MD, a dermatologist in the Chicago area and assistant clinical professor at Northwestern University Medical School, tells her rosacea patients to use a moisturizer daily. Moisturizers create a barrier that locks out irritants and can help keep symptoms at bay, but choosing the wrong one can actually make your redness worse. Choose a moisturizer that’s oil-free, fragrance-free, and hypoallergenic, Dr. Taub says: “The fewer ingredients, the better.”

    3. Use Gentle Cleansers to Avoid Triggering a Potential Flare

    Just as with moisturizer, the type of cleanser you’re using can affect your rosacea. “If you have rosacea, you need to avoid harsh cleansers and astringents, as they can make rosacea much worse,” Green says. Although rosacea can look like acne, many acne treatments are irritating for people with rosacea. Be careful with products that contain retinoids or salicylic acid. Follow the same skin-care guidelines you do for choosing a moisturizer: Your cleanser should be fragrance-free and hypoallergenic. “Be careful about how you use it,” Green adds. Remember, scrubbing has no place in a rosacea skin-care routine.

    RELATED: The Skin-Care Glossary Every Woman Needs to Have

    4. Be Careful With Facials — They May Do More Harm Than Good for Rosacea

    Chemical peels, microdermabrasion treatments, and even run-of-the-mill facials may be good for your best friend’s complexion, but they may make your rosacea worse, Green says. “These treatments can irritate the skin, which can aggravate rosacea,” she warns. If you want a rejuvenating treatment to make your skin look younger or smoother, you can work with your dermatologist to find other skin-care options.

    5. Opt for Mineral-Based, Fragrance-Free Makeup When Possible

    Makeup may be used to help cover up ruddy cheeks, but it can also worsen rosacea symptoms, says Taub. “Choose fragrance-free, mineral-based makeup,” she suggests. “This tends to be much less irritating to the skin than other types of makeup.” The formula of any makeup for rosacea counts too. When choosing a foundation, Green suggests opting for pressed powder over liquid formulas because liquid can clog the pores and make rosacea symptoms worse. If you’re unsure about how a product might affect your skin, check with your dermatologist first.

    RELATED: 10 Things Your Skin Is Trying to Tell You — and How to Respond

    6. Practice Sun Safety to Help Prevent Triggering a Rosacea Flare

    A past survey by the National Rosacea Society found that the top trigger for rosacea is sun exposure. In fact, 81 percent of respondents said that the sun triggered a rosacea flare. When you’re out in the sun, practice sun safety — apply sunscreen, wear a wide-brimmed hat, and stay in the shade as much as possible. “In general, sunscreens with chemicals are too irritating for people with rosacea, but part of the treatment for rosacea is sun protection,” says Chris G. Adigun, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. “Choose sunscreens with physical blockers, such as zinc oxide or titanium.” Just as you carefully choose rosacea skin-care products, make sure your sunscreens are also fragrance-free and hypoallergenic. Apply them generously, and reapply often.

    7. Take Steps to Calm Down Rosacea Flares When They Occur

    Flares happen when you have rosacea. To minimize rosacea symptoms, try placing ice packs on your face to calm down the inflammation, Taub suggests. Green tea extracts can also be soothing, she adds. Always watch the temperature on anything you apply to your sensitive skin. “Don’t use anything hot, as that will make it worse,” she says. Work with your dermatologist on a strategy for controlling rosacea flares. They may have specific rosacea skin-care products to recommend.

    RELATED: 5 Nighttime Skin-Care Mistakes That Are Sabotaging Your Beauty Goals

    8. Get to the Bottom of What’s Irritating Your Skin in the First Place

    While there is no cure for rosacea, treatments are becoming more tailored to people’s personal rosacea symptoms, Taub says. Topical medications, like creams, lotions, and gels, as well as oral medications, may help reduce inflammation and redness. “If you have a lot of bumps and breakouts with rosacea, topical and oral antibiotics come into play,” Taub adds. People with dilated blood vessels, permanent redness, and other changes on the nose and cheeks may benefit from surgical options, such as laser treatment or intense pulsed light. Talk to your dermatologist to make sure you’re doing all that you can to minimize your symptoms.

    Additional reporting by Melinda Carstensen.

    FAQs

    How do you calm rosacea quickly?

    How to calm rosacea flare-ups

    1. Soothe skin with a gentle, fragrance-free moisturizer.
    2. Use a humidifier to prevent dry air from removing moisture from the skin.
    3. Drink enough water to stay hydrated and prevent the skin from drying.
    4. Dip a towel in cold water and drape it around the neck.

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    How do you clear up rosacea?

    Treatments

    1. Brimonidine (Mirvaso), a gel that tightens blood vessels in the skin to get rid of some of your redness.
    2. Azelaic acid, a gel and foam that clears up bumps, swelling, and redness.
    3. Metronidazole (Flagyl) and doxycycline, antibiotics that kill bacteria on your skin and bring down redness and swelling.

    Sep 2, 2021

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    What helps with rosacea on face?

    Antibiotics often used to treat rosacea include tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline and erythromycin. These medications are usually taken for 4 to 6 weeks, but longer courses may be necessary if the spots are persistent

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    What is the main cause of rosacea?

    The cause of rosacea is unknown, but it could be due to an overactive immune system, heredity, environmental factors or a combination of these. Rosacea is not caused by poor hygiene and it’s not contagious. Flare-ups might be triggered by: Hot drinks and spicy foods

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    What calms rosacea redness?

    For mild to moderate rosacea, your doctor may prescribe a cream or gel that you apply to the affected skin. Brimonidine (Mirvaso) and oxymetazoline (Rhofade) reduce flushing by constricting blood vessels. You may see results within 12 hours after use.

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    Can you reverse rosacea?

    Is there a cure for rosacea? While there is no cure for rosacea and the cause is unknown, medical therapy is available to control or reverse its signs and symptoms. If you suspect that you might have rosacea, meet with your doctor. Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 10/10/2019.

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    Should you put moisturizer on rosacea?

    Moisturize every day.

    Whether rosacea makes your skin dry or oily, it’s important to moisturize. Moisturizing helps hydrate your skin by trapping water in your skin. This can reduce irritation and make your skin feel more comfortable.

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    What is the number one treatment for rosacea?

    Metronidazole. Metronidazole is an antibiotic drug that reduces inflammation. It is very commonly used in the treatment of rosacea. Metronidazole products are applied to the affected areas of skin once or twice a day in the form of a cream, lotion or gel.

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    Will rosacea ever go away?

    Rosacea cannot be cured, but treatment can help relieve symptoms and improve skin appearance. Remember to always wear sunscreen. Avoid known triggers to prevent flare-ups. If left untreated, rosacea can get worse over time.

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    Is it OK to wear makeup with rosacea?

    Mineral makeup is often a good choice for skin with rosacea, as it typically doesn’t contain potentially irritating ingredients. There are also innovative mineral powder formulas specifically formulated to color-correct redness.

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    How do celebrities deal with rosacea?

    Renee Zellweger

    Topical ointments such as creams and gels and oral medicines are the mainstays of rosacea treatment. When more relief is needed, lasers and intense pulsed light treatments can relieve redness and improve the look of visible blood vessels.

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    Does caffeine make rosacea worse?

    For some people, it’s tough to prevent flare-ups of rosacea, the reddened and sometimes bumpy skin that shows up on the cheeks, nose, and other areas of the face. Caffeine, heat and sun exposure, and a long list of foods (everything from spicy foods to yogurt) have been thought to trigger rosacea or make it worse.

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    Is rosacea related to gut health?

    Rosacea has been reported to be associated with various gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and small intestine bacterial overgrowth.

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    How can I cover rosacea on my cheeks?

    In order to counteract the redness of your rosacea, you will need to apply a yellow or green tinted concealer. Use a large-sized concealer brush to cover all of your problem areas. Even with large problem areas, you’ll find that less is always more.

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    How do you wear makeup with rosacea?

    Green-tinted primer

    Green-tinted makeup can be a good counterbalance to the redness caused by rosacea. This is due to green and red being complementary colors on the color wheel. Applying a green-tinted primer before applying foundation will help disguise any flare-ups or flushing.

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    6 rosacea skin care tips dermatologists give their patients

    6 rosacea skin care tips dermatologists give their patients Diseases & conditions Coronavirus Resource Center Acne Eczema Hair loss Psoriasis Rosacea Skin cancer A to Z diseases A to Z videos DIY acne treatment How dermatologists treat Skin care: Acne-prone skin Causes Is it really acne? Types & treatments Childhood eczema Adult eczema Insider secrets Types of hair loss Treatment for hair loss Causes of hair loss Hair care matters Insider secrets What is psoriasis Diagnosis & treatment Skin, hair & nail care Triggers Insider secrets What is rosacea Treatment Skin care & triggers Insider secrets Types and treatment Find skin cancer Prevent skin cancer Raise awareness Español Featured Monkeypox: What you need to know Monkeypox is a contagious disease that causes a rash. A board-certified dermatologist explains what the rash looks like and when to seek medical care. When to treat molluscum contagiosum This contagious skin disease will usually clear on its own, but sometimes dermatologists recommend treating it. Find out when. Everyday care Skin care basics Skin care secrets Injured skin Itchy skin Sun protection Hair & scalp care Nail care secrets Basic skin care Dry, oily skin Hair removal Tattoos and piercings Anti-aging skin care For your face For your skin routine Preventing skin problems Bites & stings Burns, cuts, & other wounds Itch relief Poison ivy, oak & sumac Rashes Shade, clothing, and sunscreen Sun damage and your skin Aprenda a proteger su piel del sol Your hair Your scalp Nail care basics Manicures & pedicures Featured Practice Safe Sun Everyone’s at risk for skin cancer. These dermatologists’ tips tell you how to protect your skin. Relieve uncontrollably itchy skin Find out what may be causing the itch and what can bring relief. Darker Skin Tones Skin care secrets Hair care Hair loss Diseases & Conditions Acne Dark spots Light spots Razor bumps Caring for Black hair Scalp psoriasis Weaves & extensions Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia Frontal fibrosing alopecia Hairstyles that pull can cause hair loss Acanthosis nigricans Acne keloidalis nuchae Hidradenitis suppurativa Keloid scars Lupus and your skin Sarcoidosis and your skin Skin cancer Vitiligo Featured Fade dark spots Find out why dark spots appear and what can fade them. Untreatable razor bumps or acne? If you have what feels like razor bumps or acne on the back of your neck or scalp, you may have acne keloidalis nuchae. Find out what can help. Cosmetic treatments Your safety Age spots & dark marks Cellulite & fat removal Hair removal Scars & stretch marks Wrinkles Younger-looking skin Featured Laser hair removal You can expect permanent results in all but one area. Do you know which one? Scar treatment If you want to diminish a noticeable scar, know these 10 things before having laser treatment. Botox It can smooth out deep wrinkles and lines, but the results aren’t permanent. Here’s how long botox tends to last. Public health programs Skin cancer awareness Free skin cancer screenings Kids’ camp Good Skin Knowledge Shade Structure grants Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!™ Awareness campaigns Flyers & posters Get involved Lesson plans and activities Community grants Featured Free materials to help raise skin cancer awareness Use these professionally produced online infographics, posters, and videos to help others find and prevent skin cancer. Dermatologist-approved lesson plans, activities you can use Free to everyone, these materials teach young people about common skin conditions, which can prevent misunderstanding and bullying. Find a dermatologist Find a dermatologist What is a dermatologist? Why choose a board-certified dermatologist? FAAD: What it means How to select a dermatologist Telemedicine appointments Prior authorization Dermatologists team up to improve patient care Featured Find a Dermatologist You can search by location, condition, and procedure to find the dermatologist that’s right for you. Why choose a board-certified dermatologist? When it comes to treating the skin, plenty of people say they…

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    How to prevent rosacea flare-ups

    How to prevent rosacea flare-ups Diseases & conditions Coronavirus Resource Center Acne Eczema Hair loss Psoriasis Rosacea Skin cancer A to Z diseases A to Z videos DIY acne treatment How dermatologists treat Skin care: Acne-prone skin Causes Is it really acne? Types & treatments Childhood eczema Adult eczema Insider secrets Types of hair loss Treatment for hair loss Causes of hair loss Hair care matters Insider secrets What is psoriasis Diagnosis & treatment Skin, hair & nail care Triggers Insider secrets What is rosacea Treatment Skin care & triggers Insider secrets Types and treatment Find skin cancer Prevent skin cancer Raise awareness Español Featured Monkeypox: What you need to know Monkeypox is a contagious disease that causes a rash. A board-certified dermatologist explains what the rash looks like and when to seek medical care. When to treat molluscum contagiosum This contagious skin disease will usually clear on its own, but sometimes dermatologists recommend treating it. Find out when. Everyday care Skin care basics Skin care secrets Injured skin Itchy skin Sun protection Hair & scalp care Nail care secrets Basic skin care Dry, oily skin Hair removal Tattoos and piercings Anti-aging skin care For your face For your skin routine Preventing skin problems Bites & stings Burns, cuts, & other wounds Itch relief Poison ivy, oak & sumac Rashes Shade, clothing, and sunscreen Sun damage and your skin Aprenda a proteger su piel del sol Your hair Your scalp Nail care basics Manicures & pedicures Featured Practice Safe Sun Everyone’s at risk for skin cancer. These dermatologists’ tips tell you how to protect your skin. Relieve uncontrollably itchy skin Find out what may be causing the itch and what can bring relief. Darker Skin Tones Skin care secrets Hair care Hair loss Diseases & Conditions Acne Dark spots Light spots Razor bumps Caring for Black hair Scalp psoriasis Weaves & extensions Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia Frontal fibrosing alopecia Hairstyles that pull can cause hair loss Acanthosis nigricans Acne keloidalis nuchae Hidradenitis suppurativa Keloid scars Lupus and your skin Sarcoidosis and your skin Skin cancer Vitiligo Featured Fade dark spots Find out why dark spots appear and what can fade them. Untreatable razor bumps or acne? If you have what feels like razor bumps or acne on the back of your neck or scalp, you may have acne keloidalis nuchae. Find out what can help. Cosmetic treatments Your safety Age spots & dark marks Cellulite & fat removal Hair removal Scars & stretch marks Wrinkles Younger-looking skin Featured Laser hair removal You can expect permanent results in all but one area. Do you know which one? Scar treatment If you want to diminish a noticeable scar, know these 10 things before having laser treatment. Botox It can smooth out deep wrinkles and lines, but the results aren’t permanent. Here’s how long botox tends to last. Public health programs Skin cancer awareness Free skin cancer screenings Kids’ camp Good Skin Knowledge Shade Structure grants Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!™ Awareness campaigns Flyers & posters Get involved Lesson plans and activities Community grants Featured Free materials to help raise skin cancer awareness Use these professionally produced online infographics, posters, and videos to help others find and prevent skin cancer. Dermatologist-approved lesson plans, activities you can use Free to everyone, these materials teach young people about common skin conditions, which can prevent misunderstanding and bullying. Find a dermatologist Find a dermatologist What is a dermatologist? Why choose a board-certified dermatologist? FAAD: What it means How to select a dermatologist Telemedicine appointments Prior authorization Dermatologists team up to improve patient care Featured Find a Dermatologist You can search by location, condition, and procedure to find the dermatologist that’s right for you. Why choose a board-certified dermatologist? When it comes to treating the skin, plenty of people say they have expertise. Only a board-certified dermatologist has these credentials.

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    Rosacea – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

    Rosacea – Diagnosis and treatment DiagnosisNo specific test is used to diagnosis rosacea. Instead, your doctor relies on the history of your symptoms and an examination of your skin. You may have tests to rule out other conditions, such as psoriasis or lupus. Studies show that in people of color, rosacea can be missed or misdiagnosed as an allergic reaction or seborrheic dermatitis. If your symptoms involve your eyes, your doctor may refer you to an eye specialist (ophthalmologist) for evaluation. TreatmentTreatment for rosacea focuses on controlling signs and symptoms. Most often this requires a combination of good skin care and prescription drugs. The duration of your treatment depends on the type and severity of your signs and symptoms. Recurrence is common. MedicationsNew rosacea medications have been developed in recent years. The type of medication your doctor prescribes depends on which signs and symptoms you’re experiencing. You may need to try different options or a combination of drugs to find a treatment that works for you. Prescription drugs for rosacea include: Topical drugs that reduce flushing. For mild to moderate rosacea, your doctor may prescribe a cream or gel that you apply to the affected skin. Brimonidine (Mirvaso) and oxymetazoline (Rhofade) reduce flushing by constricting blood vessels. You may see results within 12 hours after use. The effect on the blood vessels is temporary, so the medication needs to be applied regularly to maintain improvements. Other topical products help control the pimples of mild rosacea. These drugs include azelaic acid (Azelex, Finacea), metronidazole (Metrogel, Noritate, others) and ivermectin (Soolantra). With azelaic acid and metronidazole, noticeable improvements generally don’t appear for two to six weeks. Ivermectin may take even longer to improve skin, but it results in a longer remission than does metronidazole. Oral antibiotics. Your doctor may prescribe an oral antibiotic such as doxycycline (Oracea, others) for moderate to severe rosacea with bumps and pimples. Oral acne drug. If you have severe rosacea that doesn’t respond to other therapies, your doctor may suggest isotretinoin (Amnesteem, Claravis, others). It’s a powerful oral acne drug that also helps clear up acnelike lesions of rosacea. Don’t use this drug during pregnancy as it can cause serious birth defects. Laser therapyLaser therapy can make enlarged blood vessels less visible. Because the laser targets visible veining, it’s most effective on skin that isn’t tanned, brown or black. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of laser therapy. Side effects of laser therapy for rosacea include swelling and bruising that might last for several days. Icing and gentle skin care will be needed during the recovery period. On brown or black skin, laser treatment might cause long-term or permanent discoloration of the treated skin. The full effect of the treatment might not be noticeable for weeks. Repeat treatments may be needed periodically to maintain the improved appearance of your skin. Laser treatment for rosacea is usually considered a cosmetic procedure, which insurance typically doesn’t cover.More Information From Mayo Clinic to your inbox Sign up for free, and stay up to date on research advancements, health tips and current health topics, like COVID-19, plus expertise on managing health. To provide you with the most relevant and helpful information, and understand which information is beneficial, we may combine your email and website usage information with other information we have about you. If you are a Mayo Clinic patient, this could include protected health information. If we combine this information with your protected health information, we will treat all of that information as protected health information and will only use or disclose that information as set forth in our notice of privacy practices. You may opt-out of email communications at any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link in the e-mail. Lifestyle and home remediesThese self-care practices may help you control the signs and symptoms of rosacea and prevent flare-ups: Identify and avoid triggers. Pay attention to what tends to cause flare-ups for you and avoid those triggers. Protect your face. Apply sunscreen liberally daily before going outdoors. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen — which blocks both ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B rays — with an SPF of 30 or higher. Apply sunscreen after you apply…

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    8 Essential Skin-Care Tips for People With Rosacea

    8 Critical Skin-Care Tips for RosaceaFor many people, rosacea causes more than just facial flushing and redness. Symptoms of the skin condition may also include acne-like bumps, eye irritation, and thickened skin, according to the National Rosacea Society. Although there is no consensus about what causes rosacea, treatments are improving. To decrease redness, try these rosacea skin-care tips.1. Know Your Triggers for Flares and Try to Avoid ThemSpicy food, alcohol, sun exposure, extreme heat or cold, stress, and even your skin-care products may trigger a rosacea flare, according to the National Rosacea Society. What are your triggers? Keep a journal or make mental notes to determine what may be causing your rosacea symptoms, says Michele Green, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City. You can avoid some triggers, though you may have trouble sidestepping certain other ones. If you do experience a flare, you can minimize your symptoms by taking a cool shower or gently cleaning your face with rosacea skin-care products. “Just don’t scrub, as this will make things worse,” Dr. Green cautions.RELATED: What to Eat and Avoid to Reduce Rosacea Flares2. Moisturize, Moisturize, Moisturize to Manage RosaceaMoisturizer is an essential skin-care product for rosacea. Amy Forman Taub, MD, a dermatologist in the Chicago area and assistant clinical professor at Northwestern University Medical School, tells her rosacea patients to use a moisturizer daily. Moisturizers create a barrier that locks out irritants and can help keep symptoms at bay, but choosing the wrong one can actually make your redness worse. Choose a moisturizer that’s oil-free, fragrance-free, and hypoallergenic, Dr. Taub says: “The fewer ingredients, the better.”3. Use Gentle Cleansers to Avoid Triggering a Potential FlareJust as with moisturizer, the type of cleanser you’re using can affect your rosacea. “If you have rosacea, you need to avoid harsh cleansers and astringents, as they can make rosacea much worse,” Green says. Although rosacea can look like acne, many acne treatments are irritating for people with rosacea. Be careful with products that contain retinoids or salicylic acid. Follow the same skin-care guidelines you do for choosing a moisturizer: Your cleanser should be fragrance-free and hypoallergenic. “Be careful about how you use it,” Green adds. Remember, scrubbing has no place in a rosacea skin-care routine.RELATED: The Skin-Care Glossary Every Woman Needs to Have4. Be Careful With Facials — They May Do More Harm Than Good for RosaceaChemical peels, microdermabrasion treatments, and even run-of-the-mill facials may be good for your best friend’s complexion, but they may make your rosacea worse, Green says. “These treatments can irritate the skin, which can aggravate rosacea,” she warns. If you want a rejuvenating treatment to make your skin look younger or smoother, you can work with your dermatologist to find other skin-care options.5. Opt for Mineral-Based, Fragrance-Free Makeup When PossibleMakeup may be used to help cover up ruddy cheeks, but it can also worsen rosacea symptoms, says Taub. “Choose fragrance-free, mineral-based makeup,” she suggests. “This tends to be much less irritating to the skin than other types of makeup.” The formula of any makeup for rosacea counts too. When choosing a foundation, Green suggests opting for pressed powder over liquid formulas because liquid can clog the pores and make rosacea symptoms worse. If you’re unsure about how a product might affect your skin, check with your dermatologist first.RELATED: 10 Things Your Skin Is Trying to Tell You — and How to Respond6. Practice Sun Safety to Help Prevent Triggering a Rosacea FlareA past survey by the National Rosacea Society found that the top trigger for rosacea is sun exposure. In fact, 81 percent of respondents said that the sun triggered a rosacea flare. When you’re out in the sun, practice sun safety — apply sunscreen, wear a wide-brimmed hat, and stay in the shade as much as possible. “In general, sunscreens with chemicals are too irritating for people with rosacea, but part of the treatment for rosacea is sun protection,” says Chris G. Adigun, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. “Choose…

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    Rosacea On Face: Symptoms, Causes, Treatments – WebMD

    What Is Rosacea? Menu If your face looks like you’re blushing and you get bumps that are a bit like acne, you might have a skin condition called rosacea. Your doctor can suggest medicine and other treatments to manage your symptoms, and there are plenty of steps you can take at home to make yourself look and feel better.SymptomsThe biggest thing you’ll notice is redness on your cheeks, nose, chin, and forehead. Less often, the color can appear on your neck, head, ears, or chest.After a while, broken blood vessels might show through your skin, which can thicken and swell up. Up to half of people with rosacea also get eye problems like redness, swelling, and pain.Other symptoms you may get are:Stinging and burning of your skinPatches of rough, dry skinA swollen, bulb-shaped noseLarger poresBroken blood vessels on your eyelidsBumps on your eyelidsProblems with seeingYour rosacea symptoms can come and go. They might flare up for a few weeks, fade, and then come back.Getting treatment is a must, so make sure you see your doctor. If you don’t take care of your rosacea, redness and swelling can get worse and might become permanent.What Causes It?Doctors don’t know exactly what causes rosacea. A few things that may play a role are:Your genes. Rosacea often runs in families.Blood vessel trouble. The redness on your skin might be due to problems with blood vessels in your face. Sun damage could cause them to get wider, which makes it easier for other people to see them.Mites. They’re tiny insects. A type called Demodex folliculorum normally lives on your skin and usually isn’t harmful. Some people, though, have a heightened sensitivity to the mites, or more of these bugs than usual.. Too many mites could irritate your skin.Bacteria. A type called H. pylori normally lives in your gut. Some studies suggest this germ can raise the amount of a digestive hormone called gastrin, which might cause your skin to look flushed.Some things about you may make you more likely to get rosacea. For instance, your chances of getting the skin condition go up if you:Have light skin, blonde hair, and blue eyesAre between ages 30 and 50Are a womanHave family members with rosaceaHad severe acneSmokeTreatmentsThere isn’t a cure for rosacea, but treatments can help you manage the redness, bumps, and other symptoms.Your doctor may suggest these medicines:Brimonidine (Mirvaso), a gel that tightens blood vessels in the skin to get rid of some of your redness.Azelaic acid, a gel and foam that clears up bumps, swelling, and redness.Metronidazole (Flagyl) and doxycycline, antibiotics that kill bacteria on your skin and bring down redness and swelling.Isotretinoin (Amnesteem, Claravis, and others), an acne drug that clears up skin bumps. Don’t use it if you’re pregnant because it can cause serious birth defects.Ivermectin (Soolantra) and oxymetazoline are topicals that are used to treat rosacea.It can take you a few weeks or months of using one of these medicines for your skin to improve.Your doctor may also recommend some procedures to treat your rosacea, such as:Lasers that use intense light to get rid of blood vessels that have gotten biggerDermabrasion, which sands off the top layer of skinElectrocautery, an electric current that zaps damaged blood vesselsDIY Skin Care for RosaceaThere’s a lot you can do on your own. For starters, try to figure out the things that trigger an outbreak, and then avoid them. To help you do this, keep a journal that tracks your activities and your flare-ups.Some things that often trigger…

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    Understanding Rosacea — Diagnosis and Treatment – WebMD

    Understanding Rosacea — Diagnosis and Treatment Menu How Do I Know If I Have Rosacea?Rosacea is diagnosed by examining the skin on your face. The presence of enlarged blood vessels will distinguish it from other skin disorders. Early diagnosis and treatment is important to control rosacea and prevent its progression.What Are the Treatments for Rosacea?There is no cure for rosacea. The primary goal of treatment is to control the redness, inflammation, and skin eruptions. The biggest key to controlling rosacea is to avoid triggers — factors that cause the skin to flush.Common triggers include sun exposure, very hot or very cold weather, alcohol, very hot foods, spicy foods, intense exercise, and stress. In addition, menopause and some drugs may cause flushing. To help identify your triggers, keep a diary of when symptoms appear, what you were doing, the environmental conditions, and what you think may have brought on your symptoms. Discuss this with your doctor.Proper skin care can also help. Use very mild skin cleansers and high-quality, oil-free cosmetics and moisturizers to help prevent irritation. Also, use a sunscreen with broad spectrum coverage (SPF 30 or higher for UVB protection and zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, or avobenzone for UVA protection) to help prevent symptoms triggered by sunlight. If these measures aren’t enough, long-term treatment with oral antibiotics such as erythromycin (ERYC), metronidazole (Flagyl), tetracycline, doxycycline (Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), and minocycline (Dynacin, Solodyn) has been shown to control skin eruptions and curb the progression of rosacea. In most cases, results take a few months to appear, so patience and diligence are required. Because there is no cure for rosacea, treatment with prescription medication is often required for months to years to control symptoms.In addition, dermatologists commonly prescribe topical creams, lotions, ointments, gels, foams, or pads, such as:Azelaic acid (Azelex and Finacea)Brimonidine (Mirvaso)Clindamycin (Cleocin, Clindagel, and ClindaMax)Erythromycin (Erygel)Ivermectin (Soolantra)Metronidazole (MetroCream or MetroGel)Oxymetazoline (Rhofade)Sodium sulfacetamide and sulfur (Avar, Sulfacet, Clenia and Plexion)In more advanced cases, laser surgery may be used to eliminate visible blood vessels or excess skin tissue caused by rhinophyma.

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    Rosacea flare ups: Causes and calming tips

    Rosacea flare ups: Causes and calming tipsRosacea is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the skin. It typically causes visible and enlarged blood vessels of the face, redness, and small pus-filled bumps.Research estimates that around 5.46% of adults worldwide live with rosacea. Still, doctors may mistake its symptoms for acne or psoriasis.People with rosacea may experience periods of remission from symptoms along with flare-ups, which are periods of worsening symptoms. Often, people can identify specific triggers that cause flare-ups. These may include certain foods, heat, weather, stress, and medications.Although rosacea may be uncomfortable and there is no cure for the condition, people can manage their flare-ups with various treatments.This article looks at rosacea flare-ups, their causes, treatment, and prevention.People with rosacea have extremely sensitive skin, meaning many factors can cause flare-ups. For example, spending time in the sun can cause skin redness and flushing that lasts for hours. Skin care products can also cause symptoms such as stinging, burning, and itching.Doctors use the term “trigger” to refer to the things that cause rosacea flare-ups. Triggers vary between people, but they commonly include:Foods: Dairy products, liver, citrus fruits, vinegar, chocolate, soy sauce, beans, and spicy foods.Beverages: Alcohol, particularly red wine, beer, and spirits, and hot drinks, including tea and coffee.Emotions: Stress and anxiety.Cosmetics: Skin and hair products, including hairspray, witch hazel, acetone substances, and those containing alcohol.Heat: Hot baths, saunas, and warm environments.Weather: The sun, cold, humidity, and strong winds.Physical exertion: Exercise, lifting and loading heavy items, or other strenuous activities.Medications: Topical steroids and vasodilators.Medical conditions: Chronic cough, menopause, and caffeine withdrawal syndrome.People may find that their rosacea flare-up calms down somewhat when they avoid triggers.The following tips may also help:Soothe skin with a gentle, fragrance-free moisturizer.Use a humidifier to prevent dry air from removing moisture from the skin.Drink enough water to stay hydrated and prevent the skin from drying.Dip a towel in cold water and drape it around the neck.Try some stress relief techniques such as yoga and meditation.It is not easy to specify how long a rosacea flare-up lasts as it varies from person to person. However, anecdotal evidence suggests it can be from days to months.Rosacea is a chronic condition with periods of remission and relapses or flare-ups. In a retrospective study of 48 people diagnosed with rosacea, 52% of individuals had active rosacea, which had been ongoing for 13 years on average. The remaining 48% had cleared their rosacea, and the average duration of the condition was 9 years.Research indicates that people who continue their rosacea treatments for the long term are less likely to experience a flare-up.People can help prevent rosacea flare-ups by identifying and avoiding their triggers. Keeping a diary of what they eat and drink, activities they participate in, and locations they visit, alongside their rosacea symptoms, may help a person understand the factors that cause flare-ups.The following tips may also help people avoid rosacea flare-ups:Use sun protection: Apply a gentle broad-spectrum SPF 30 or higher sunscreen daily. Opt for fragrance-free sunscreens containing zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, or both, as these are less irritating. People should also wear a wide-brimmed hat and avoid the midday sun.Reduce stress: People can find activities that reduce their stress levels, such as tai chi or meditation. In addition, stress management breathing techniques may help in stressful moments.Avoid the…

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    Rosacea | Johns Hopkins Medicine

    Rosacea Skin What is rosacea? Rosacea is a common chronic skin condition that usually only affects the face and eyes. Occasionally, the neck, chest, or other areas may be involved. Characterized by redness, pimples, and broken blood vessels, rosacea tends to begin after middle age (between the ages of 30 and 60). It is more common in fair-skinned people and women in menopause. The cause of rosacea is unknown. An estimated more than 14 million people in the U.S. have rosacea. What are the symptoms of rosacea? Rosacea often begins with easy blushing and flushing of the facial skin. Eventually, redness will persist around the nose area. Then it extends to the rest of the face. Rosacea has a variety of clinical symptoms. It is classified into the following four types, based on these different symptoms: Prerosacea Frequent episodes of blushing and flushing of the face and neck Vascular rosacea Swelling of blood vessels under the facial skin, leading to swollen, warm skin (common in women) Inflammatory rosacea Formation of pimples and enlarged blood vessels on the face Rhinophyma Enlarged oil glands in the nose and cheeks that cause an enlarged, bulbous red nose (almost only seen in men) Eye Symptoms of Rosacea In addition, rosacea often affects the eye and eyelid. Eye symptoms may include: Redness Burning Tearing Inflamed eyelids Sensation of a foreign object in the eye The symptoms of rosacea may resemble other dermatologic conditions, such as acne. Always talk with your healthcare provider for a diagnosis. How is rosacea diagnosed? Rosacea is usually diagnosed with a complete medical history and physical exam. Treatment for rosacea Specific treatment for rosacea will be discussed with you by your healthcare provider based on: Your age, overall health, and medical history Extent of the rash Your tolerance for specific medicines, procedures, or therapies Expectations for the course of the rash Your opinion or preference The goal of treatment is to control the symptoms associated with rosacea. Treatment may include: Diet modifications (for example, avoiding foods that dilate the skin’s blood vessels, such as caffeine, spicy foods, and alcohol) Topical and oral antibiotics Prescription creams or lotions Glycolic acid peels Laser therapy Dermabrasion Electrosurgery Management If you have been diagnosed with rosacea, you can help manage the condition by: Keeping a record of triggers, such as stress, weather, or certain foods or drinks Always using a sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays and has a sun-protecting factor (SPF) of 15 or higher Being careful not to use any irritating products on your face Taking your medicines as prescribed

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    Rosacea Treatment Tips, According to Dermatologists

    3 Dermatologist-Approved Ways to Treat Rosacea Flare-UpsWe may earn commission from links on this page, but we only recommend products we back.Why Trust Us?Rosacea flare-ups can feel like a nightmare: the patchy pink spots, the all-over facial redness. Thankfully, derms say there are rosacea treatment options that can actually reduce the appearance and recurrence of the chronic skin disorder.And if you ever felt embarrassed about a flare-up that can cause red pus-filled pimples and visible blood vessels, you should know that you are not alone. 16 million Americans are dealing with rosacea. Rosacea typically appears on the face’s central areas like cheeks, nose, and forehead, explains Heidi A. Waldorf, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist and founder of Waldorf Dermatology Aesthetics in New York. Facial flushing is the most common symptom, which occurs when the blood vessels close to the skin get inflamed and dilated. Other symptoms include pimples and bumps—that should not be mistaken for acne—visible blood vessels and watery or bloodshot eyes.Tips for treating rosaceaDuring a rosacea flare-up, which is when the condition is visible on the face, you may also experience burning, stinging, and facial warmness and dryness. This can be very uncomfortable and disturbing, but you can do something about it. Derms find these treatments to be the most effective for preventing and treating rosacea:Apply a cold compress to your faceFor oncoming flare-ups, a cold compression could be all it takes to keep your rosacea from manifesting. “If you feel a flush coming on, apply ice (or a cold bottle of water or glass with ice) to your face and neck,” Dr. Waldorf says. This will calm the skin and reduce facial inflammation.Try topical or oral antibioticsDepending on the rosacea type or the severity of a flare-up, it may require prescription medication, says Nianda Reid, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist at Dermatology & Mohs Surgery Center in Pennsylvania. You can gauge the severity based on symptoms. So if your eyes are bloodshot and swollen or your facial redness is paired with unbearable burning, you can assume that it’s bad. Topical medication that can be applied directly to affected areas and oral antibiotics taken by mouth can help get your symptoms under control.The most prescribed antibiotics are brimonidine, oxymetazoline, metronidazole, and ivermectin. “They work to reduce redness and inflammation in the face by constricting blood vessels,” Dr. Reid explains. Derms find that patients who take antibiotics consistently—during and in-between flare-ups—are more likely to have fewer flare-up recurrences on a long-term basis.Consider procedural therapiesIf you’re still red in the face after trying topical and oral medications, laser therapy and other light-based treatments may help. These treatments work by using heat from the laser to penetrate blood vessels, causing them to reduce in appearance. According to the American Academy of Dermatology Association, some patients claim they’ve even seen complete clearing of redness lasting for years. However, Dr. Reid notes that “repeated and continued treatments (whether topical, oral or laser) may be needed to maintain the clearance of rosacea on your skin.”Is there a way to completely prevent flare-ups?There is no cure for rosacea. However, along with treatments, there are ways to reduce the recurrence of it. This is highly dependable on whether you’ve identified your flare-up triggers. “Possible rosacea triggers include sunlight, heat or extreme temperature, wind, exercise, caffeine, spicy food, stress, alcohol, medications such as steroids, or other irritating topical products,” Dr. Reid says. If you find that specific ones are causing your rosacea to manifest, then avoid them. But if you can’t, consider other treatment options ahead of time to plan for a potential flare-up.One thing Dr. Reid recommends for all rosacea patients despite their triggers is sunscreen. “Sun exposure is known to worsen rosacea, so it is helpful to use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF or sun protective factor 30 and above daily, and especially before sun exposure,” she explains.Here are a few sunscreen options that are great for daily use:EltaMD UV Clear Facial Sunscreen SPF 46La Roche-Posay Anthelios Ultra-Light Mineral Sunscreen SPF 50Credit: AmazonAveeno Protect + Hydrate Face Sunscreen SPF 50Now…

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