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Top 5 Disc Golf Beginner Tips



    Our statistics show that approximately 25% of disc golfers have been playing for less than two years, that’s a lot of beginners. We asked Innova athletes and ambassadors about mistakes they see beginners make and we put the top 5 Beginner Mistakes here to help them score better and have more fun on the course.

    “I have always felt that learning technique really opens up the game. Knowing what you’re doing mentally allows the body to respond more accurately.” 
    Philo Brathwaite (Innova Star Team)

    5. Etiquette and the rules of the game

    Those who come from a traditional golf background recognize that disc golf shares a lot of similarities regarding etiquette and rules. For others, having a basic understanding will help eliminate frustrations and make the game more enjoyable. For more on the unwritten rules of disc golf, see our article on Disc Golf Etiquette.

    Beginners tend to talk during throws, advance down the fairway too far, and usually end up in the thrower’s visual field. While in the thrower’s field, they tend to make movements or fidget during others’ throws. My advise to them: Be a tree! Don’t move, in other words.
    Kenny Lee (Innova Masters Team)

    Understanding the uniqueness of disc golf rules is important. The PDGA Official Rules are updated each year. Players should review the rulebook on a regular basis. 

    4. Lack of patience and focus

    A lack of focus can come from many sources, feeling amped, being nervous around other players, or witnessing a big throw. These factors and more can take away from what the players should be doing, preparing for their throw. 

    Players should take a moment to breathe and slow down the motions. Distance is important, but accuracy improves scores. Distance will come to players who focus on smooth movements. 

    “…When I teach people to throw, I suggest going about 25-50% speed as they normally would. If possible, record themselves so they can go back and see if all components are moving in sync…A lot of time they realize their disc is flying just as far as before with more accuracy, and they’re only going about 25-50% the speed they were before. Timing is key!…Remember, slow is smooth, smooth is far!”
    Nick Wood (Innova Crew Team)

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    3. “All arm” throw

    Beginners often focus all their energy in their arms. This can lead to what is sometimes referred to as an “all arm” throw where there is a lack of core and lower body engagement to build momentum and power. Like Dave Dunipace, Innova Co-founder and President, says in his “Tip of the Whip” video, there are several levers that need to be wound up in a disc golf throw in order to generate power.

    “When a beginner throws a disc, they have a tendency to let their arm hang down around their waist and their reach back happens without much rotation of their body. So they are effectively only using their shoulder muscles to throw and that leads to the disc being pulled from down around their waist to up near their shoulder. That just sends the disc up high with too much nose up and too much hyzer.”
    Jon Baldwin (Innova Masters Team)

    2. Bad disc selection

    Another observation by pro players and ambassadors is poor disc selection by beginners. This can be due to lack of knowledge about certain discs and their flight characteristics or perhaps having too many disc molds in the bag. Regardless, disc selection plays an important role in the outcome of a shot and can be the difference between a birdie and a bogey.

    “Many beginners are unsure of what discs to purchase, so they end up getting discs they aren’t knowledgeable about. They also often get discs given to them by generous people trying to grow the sport. However, this turns into a beginner having multiple molds and too much variety, rather than having one or two drivers they can become comfortable and better with. My tip is to try to minimize the bag to 5 discs or less: 1 Putter, 1 Midrange, 1 or 2 Drivers. It’s less discs to think about, with more room to think about form, technique and fun!”
    Christine Jennings (Innova Crew Team)

    In addition to simplifying the amount of molds in your bag, switching to lighter weights of the same discs can also help with control and distance.

    “Choosing the proper equipment for your current skill level is crucial to skill honing and advancement can lead to a much more enjoyable Disc Golfing experience… In order for a disc to fly as intended, you should have the arm speed required to throw that particular disc…Simply adjusting the weight could lead to more success on the Disc Golf course. Some slower speed discs that I recommend are the Innova Holly Finley Star RoadRunner (Speed 9) and the Innova SideWinder (Speed 9) in the 150g or 160g range…”
    Holly Finley (Innova Team Champion) 

    1. Throwing high speed, overstable drivers 

    The overwhelming majority of pro players said throwing high speed, overstable drivers was the number one mistake beginners make. Without proper form or the adequate arm speed, these drivers can cause frustration and mask bad form. Take it from 2018 World Champion, Gregg Barsby.

    “I think the biggest (and difficult) thing for new players to grasp is how a disc is supposed to fly. With such demand for fast discs, wider rim discs may seem like an obvious choice to throw further, however Disc Golf is about controlling where the discs go, and understanding how they got there! Distance drivers in the 7-9 speed range are more forgiving and also will help a player understand “flight characteristics”. Mainly, that’s because most new players don’t have a developed throwing style. Most of the “hi-speed” discs will all do the exact same thing for a new player… fade hard. Learning the 7-9 speed drivers will make the transition to 12-14 speed stuff a lot easier.” 
    Gregg Barsby (2018 World Champion)

    Madison Walker, Innova Star Team, changed her game for the better following her wrist injury in 2017 when she subsequently focused on throwing more backhand shots with putters.

    “Throw! More! Putters! If you can make a putter fly straight and far, the rest of your discs become unbelievably easy to control. Learning putter angles forces you to really engage that finite control you need on disc angle, and that, my friends, is a game changer!”
    Madison Walker (Innova Star Team)

    FAQs

    How do I get better at disc golf?

    Basic Rules of Disc Golf

    • Safety First. Never throw when other players or people are within range. …
    • Tee Throws. Each hole begins with a tee throw. …
    • Throwing Order. …
    • Fairway Throws. …
    • Mandatory. …
    • Unplayable Lie. …
    • Out Of Bounds. …
    • Completion Of Hole.

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    What are 5 rules of playing disc golf?

    In general, lighter discs fly farther than heavier discs, but heavier discs may fly farther in a headwind due to their greater stability. A safe bet for the average player is to throw discs weighing around 160-165 grams for best distance.

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    How do you throw a farther in disc golf?

    Excellent Full Body Exercise

    Disc golf players generally walk one or even more miles every round. This is excellent as it strengthens their upper and especially lower body muscles. In addition, the throwing motions involved in disc golf make for an excellent upper body exercise for chests, triceps, back, and shoulders.

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    Do heavier discs fly farther?

    As of 2021, top pro players who average scores lower than SSA have ratings over 1000 ranging up to 1050. PDGA amateur men average around 860 and women around 725. Each additional throw in your score will reduce your rating from 7 to 13 rating points depending on the SSA of the course.

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    Is disc golf good exercise?

    On a golf leaderboard, the letter ?E? stands for Even. This means the golfer has taken exactly the expected number of shots relative to par. He’s not taken any more or any less shots than the course should have been played in.

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    What does E mean in disc golf?

    On the most basic level, lighter discs take less effort to throw than heavy discs and as a result are often more accurate. However, light weight discs are also generally affected by wind more than heavy discs so you may find heavier discs can maintain a consistent path more effectively in windy weather.

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    Do heavier or lighter discs fly further?

    Drivers. Drivers start at around 150 grams, but beginners tend to go for something in the range of 165-169 grams because they’re easy to get good results with. But it’s not so much the case that pros immediately go to the other end of the spectrum and use 175g gram discs because they go further.

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    Are lighter discs easier to throw?

    The typical distance to pull out a midrange is anywhere inside of 300 feet/91.5 meters. Because of their ability to glide and shape shots, midranges are great for both shorter tee shots and longer upshots.

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    How far should you throw a midrange?

    In general, understable discs have a higher glide than overstable models. Glide currently ranges from around 3 to 7. The higher numbers tend to fly farther before the fade takes over turning the disc in the direction opposite to the rotation of the disc.

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    Do Understable discs fly farther?

    But a good rule of thumb: you should always carry at least six discs with you. Two drivers, two mid-range, and two putters.

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    Do lighter discs fly farther?

    When thrown on a hyzer, an overstable disc wants to find the ground. The more stability a disc has, the quicker it will want to dump out of the air and land. This means that the less stability the disc has, the longer it will take to find the ground when thrown on a hyzer.

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    How many discs should I carry?

    A disc rated 0 will finish straightest with the least fade. Discs with a low fade rating are the more understable. A disc rated 5 will fade or hook hardest at the end of the flight. Discs with a high fade rating are predictable even in wind and considered more overstable.

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    What is the most stable disc?

    Throwing Too Hard is a disease which can infect good players of the game, but it usually attacks beginners and intermediates, as they struggle to properly understand the game, their discs, and themselves, with an ever-improving but inconsistent ability.

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    101 Disc Golf Tips to Take Your Game to the Next Level

    101 Disc Golf Tips to Take Your Game to the Next Level | DiscGolfNOW.com We all want to get better at disc golf. If you’ve clicked on this post, that tells me that you’re looking for something different. You’re looking for those disc golf tips that can take your game way above where it is now. I understand, because I’m just like you. I’m trying to take my game to the next level and you are, too. I got you. Today, we’re going through 101 of the absolute best disc golf tips that I could think of. These tips should help you in every facet of your game. And if you implement them all, there’s no telling how good you can get. So, here we go! Before You Play 1. Practice A LOT…seriously, like DAILY tip number one is something you’ll see in every single tips list when you search for, “best disc golf tips,” on google. Why? Because it is hands down one of the most important tips if you want to get better at, well, anything. If you truly want to take your game to the next level, you need to put in work and practice. “Don’t practice until you get it right. Practice until you can’t get it wrong.” -anonymous But before you get upset and say, “oh, my god, did you really just tell me to practice?,” I’ll ask you this: how good do you want to be? And have you gotten that good yet? Well, if you haven’t reached your goals in disc golf yet, this is where practice comes in.  I’m not just talking about throwing some discs out on a course. This is me telling you that you need to play at the least weekly rounds or more, you need to practice putting a couple of times per week, get a practice net, go out and do field work, and you need to learn the rules and everything about disc golf. If you put in that kind of work, you’re practicing disc golf, in some form or fashion, DAILY. If you don’t put in the work, you won’t become the best. Now…for the rest of those tips. 2. Always stretch before you throw One very important part of your game should be stretching before every round. This is extremely important so that you get loose and don’t hurt yourself when you throw. For a quick video on how to stretch before you play, check out our best disc golf stretches video on Youtube, or check out our our awesome post on stretching, “The 17 Best Disc Golf Stretches to Improve Your Game.” 3. If you’re injured, don’t play Something to think about before you play is the status of your body. I’ve been injured a ton of times in my life and I always try to stubbornly play through the injury. It always ends up with me getting hurt worse. If you’re hurt in any way, take a break and skip a week or two. That way you can get back on the course soon and be at 100% percent. Check out our post, “The 11 Step Plan to Recover After a Disc Golf Workout,” to help with healing your body if you’re injured. 4. Actually get out on the course and play You can do this before or after you read this whole list, but you need to get out on the course and play. No matter what you learn or hear or watch, go out to your local course and get some reps in. That’s how you get better. Learn the Game 5. Learn about how a disc works A great way to immediately improve your game and start getting better is to learn about how a disc works. Check out our post, “How Does a Disc Golf Disc Fly Through the Air,” for a great reference on disc flight.  You can also check out a couple…

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    Top 5 Disc Golf Beginner Tips – Discmania Store

    Top 5 Disc Golf Beginner Tips Disc golf continues to grow as a popular sport. It’s becoming increasingly accessible, very affordable and fun for players of all ages and skill levels. But disc golf is also a difficult game that can be very challenging to many players. It can seem terribly complicated at times, but it keeps us coming back for more. When first starting to play, everyone seems to experience the same difficulties of trying to make a disc fly properly. It is never an easy task. But not to worry, now is absolutely the best time for you to learn disc golf. Follow these fundamental disc golf beginner tips and you’ll be right on your way. 1) Learn Basic Technique By learning the basics and building up crucial elements of your game you will progress as a disc golfer. Proper but simple technique involves minimizing unnecessary movements and motions that are going to directly affect extension, speed and power from the throw. The disc golf throwing motion is an athletic movement. It combines proper stance alignment, posture, and balance. You use entire body to throw the disc and not just the arm. Use a technique that produces positive results. Start with a stand-still throw and progress to a full run up. Use a straight linear reach back with full extension of arm and elbow, bring the arm through the midsection driving the elbow and accelerating through to the release. You might want to watch our Deep in the Game instructional video for a backhand throw. Keep it simple as possible while limiting unnecessary body movements as well as concentrating more on control and accuracy over distance. 2) Disc Release – Flat and Low Focus on keeping the disc flat and low. Always remember, flat and low. The most common mistake that I’ve seen as a disc golf instructor is the player’s tendency to swoop the arm low and release the disc at an upward angle. This causes the disc to go nose-up, stall out, and finish back to the ground with extreme angle and no forward distance. Don’t worry, every player that picks up a disc for the first time has done this at some point and if you’re shaking your head, it’s time to be honest. It happens to all of us when we first start throwing. By breaking out of this habit, you’ll see improvement. Concentrate on keeping the disc level to the ground, and the same height throughout the entire throwing motion from the reach back extension, the pull through, and the eventual release of the disc. Take a few warm-up arm swings to determine your release point and do everything possible to keep that disc on the same level plane when reaching back and pulling-through being aware of the keeping the disc flat throughout the throwing motion. Lastly focusing on the leading edge or nose angle of the disc to ensure that it’s flat and level while driving the disc to get that forward penetration down the fairway. 3) Develop a Practice Routine When just starting with disc golf there should be no expectations and you should just go out there to play casually. Once the addiction sets in and the competitive juices start flowing, you will soon realize that you want to personally get better as a disc golfer. Even if you’re only playing a few rounds a week, by learning the fundamentals, you will see improvement. I highly recommend that you dedicate…

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    Top 5 Most Common Beginner Mistakes | Disc Golf Beginner's …

    Beginner Tips | Noodle Arm Disc Golf

    Beginner Tips So you’ve recently discovered disc golf, eh? Congratulations! What you’ve found is a cheap, legal alternative to narcotics. Just as fun, probably more addicting. As a new player, though, it can be tough to sift through all the noise and not be overwhelmed with information. I remember spending too many hours as a new player scouring the internet and various message boards for any tidbits I could absorb, and it wasn’t exactly smooth sailing. Suffice to say, it was information overload. My goal here, then, is to fire up the flux capacitor, turn back the clock to when I was a new disc golfer, and think about what would have been helpful to me back then. Hopefully, it will help you now. Consider me the Doc Brown to your Marty McFly. Tip 1: Understable plastic is your friend As a new player, it’s not likely you’re going to have the form developed to handle the fast, overstable stuff. What do I mean by overstable? If you picked up a Destroyer, say, because it had a cool name, but you can’t make it fly straight, you have an overstable disc. Understable discs – ones that are designed to turn right for a right-handed backhanded thrower in the beginning phase of the flight – are going to be the easiest to get up to speed and, as a result fly straight. For some suggestions on good understable discs, keep reading, or consult columns K-Q of the Marshall Street Disc Golf Flight Guide. Tip 2: Slow discs mean more control I know, I know. Slow isn’t sexy. But you know what is? Staying in the fairway. While many disc golf manufacturers will hype their newest high speed disc as great for beginners, that’s all marketing spin. Sure, it may go far, but it doesn’t do you much good to throw far if half of the distance is a meathook fade that has you staring at a jail of trees to reach the basket. Grabbing a stack of your favorite putter and hitting the basket may not sound fun, but it’ll slice strokes off your score. As a new player, discs with a speed rating of 7 and under are generally safe. You’ll get plenty of distance, but more control than you will with faster discs. If that means being 100 feet away from the basket with a clear shot instead of 50 feet out in the middle of the forest, that’s a good sacrifice to make. Tip 3: Throw what gets you to the basket I’m going to totally contradict myself here, but bear with me. As touched on above, the predominant line of thinking from experienced disc golfers is that you should throw the slowest disc possible that will get you to the basket because slow means control. This is excellent advice that should not be discounted. As a new player, though, just throw whatever the hell gets you to the basket the quickest. You may not be able to throw a putter well for drives yet (or have even realized that people drive with putters), or you may feel more confident throwing a driver even if it only goes 150 feet. Maybe there is some low-hanging canopy that won’t let you throw a midrange (as these discs generally need more height to work), or perhaps there is a line that is just begging for a low skip shot. Just have fun, get as close to the basket as you can, and go from there. Plus,…

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    5 Beginner Mistakes to Avoid – Innova Disc Golf

    5 Beginner Mistakes to Avoid Our statistics show that approximately 25% of disc golfers have been playing for less than two years, that’s a lot of beginners. We asked Innova athletes and ambassadors about mistakes they see beginners make and we put the top 5 Beginner Mistakes here to help them score better and have more fun on the course. “I have always felt that learning technique really opens up the game. Knowing what you’re doing mentally allows the body to respond more accurately.”  –Philo Brathwaite (Innova Star Team) 5. Etiquette and the rules of the game Those who come from a traditional golf background recognize that disc golf shares a lot of similarities regarding etiquette and rules. For others, having a basic understanding will help eliminate frustrations and make the game more enjoyable. For more on the unwritten rules of disc golf, see our article on Disc Golf Etiquette. Beginners tend to talk during throws, advance down the fairway too far, and usually end up in the thrower’s visual field. While in the thrower’s field, they tend to make movements or fidget during others’ throws. My advise to them: Be a tree! Don’t move, in other words. –Kenny Lee (Innova Masters Team) Understanding the uniqueness of disc golf rules is important. The PDGA Official Rules are updated each year. Players should review the rulebook on a regular basis.  4. Lack of patience and focus A lack of focus can come from many sources, feeling amped, being nervous around other players, or witnessing a big throw. These factors and more can take away from what the players should be doing, preparing for their throw.  Players should take a moment to breathe and slow down the motions. Distance is important, but accuracy improves scores. Distance will come to players who focus on smooth movements.  “…When I teach people to throw, I suggest going about 25-50% speed as they normally would. If possible, record themselves so they can go back and see if all components are moving in sync…A lot of time they realize their disc is flying just as far as before with more accuracy, and they’re only going about 25-50% the speed they were before. Timing is key!…Remember, slow is smooth, smooth is far!” –Nick Wood (Innova Crew Team) CHECK OUT THE DISC GOLF GUIDE 3. “All arm” throw Beginners often focus all their energy in their arms. This can lead to what is sometimes referred to as an “all arm” throw where there is a lack of core and lower body engagement to build momentum and power. Like Dave Dunipace, Innova Co-founder and President, says in his “Tip of the Whip” video, there are several levers that need to be wound up in a disc golf throw in order to generate power. “When a beginner throws a disc, they have a tendency to let their arm hang down around their waist and their reach back happens without much rotation of their body. So they are effectively only using their shoulder muscles to throw and that leads to the disc being pulled from down around their waist to up near their shoulder. That just sends the disc up high with too much nose up and too much hyzer.” –Jon Baldwin (Innova Masters Team) 2. Bad disc selection Another observation by pro players and ambassadors is poor disc selection by beginners. This can be due to lack of knowledge about certain discs and their flight characteristics or perhaps having too many disc molds in the bag. Regardless, disc selection plays an important role in the outcome of a shot and can be the difference between a birdie and a bogey. “Many beginners are unsure of what discs to purchase, so they end up getting discs they aren’t knowledgeable about. They also often get discs given to them by generous people trying to grow the sport. However, this…

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    Ultimate Beginner's Guide To Disc Golf – Instructions, Pictures …

    Ultimate Beginner’s Guide To Disc Golf – Instructions, Pictures, & Tips! Getting started playing disc golf is super easy, but there are a few things I can tell you that will make your first outing feel and look like you’re a natural. This is my ultimate beginner’s guide and cover’s all the essentials. Everything you absolutely need to know to get you started if you’re brand new to disc golf. Here’s an overview of what this guide cover’s. Feel free to jump to the section that interests you most or just start from the beginning (which is what I recommend!) How To Play Disc Golf We’re going to start with the basics… This is a guide for beginners after all. So let’s get the easy stuff out of the way first. What is disc golf, and how do you play it? From a beginner’s standpoint, you can think of disc golf as a game created by combining traditional ball golf and the throwing of specialized frisbees. Just remove the golf clubs and golf balls, and replace them with a bag full of plastic discs. What you’re left with is the game of disc golf! Many of the same terms and rules apply to both traditional ball golf and disc golf. For instance, the score is counted the same way, where one throw equals one stroke. Each hole has a par (which is the amount of strokes, or throws, it should take to finish the hole), and the goal is to shoot at or lower than par. Shooting par on every hole keeps your score at 0. Any strokes above par are counted as +1 and any strokes below par are counted as -1. For instance, if it took you 4 throws to make the disc in the basket on the first hole, and that hole is a par 3, then your score is +1 (pronounced “plus one). The goal of the game is to throw a disc from the tee pad toward the basket, then keep shooting until you make your disc into the basket. Once you’ve thrown your disc into the basket, you’ve completed the hole. Count your score and move onto the next hole. You’ll keep going like this until you’ve played all the holes on the course, which is typically 18 holes, just like traditional ball golf. If you’re playing as part of a group, the person with the lowest score wins. What Are The Disc Types In traditional ball golf, there are different types of clubs and you use those clubs for different purposes. For instance, drivers are meant for hitting the ball long distances off the tee. Fairway drivers still shoot long, just not as long as the distance drivers and can be used on the fairway. Then you’ve got your irons which are meant for a wide range of middle length shots, and finally the putter which is used for putting. Disc golf is very similar to ball golf in this regard. There are discs meant for distance driving, fairway driving, and putting. There are also mid-range discs which are like the irons in traditional ball golf and are used for a wide variety of middle length shots. You’ll find that the different types of discs will look quite different from each other. For instance, discs meant for distance driving off the tee pad are typically very flat with a wide rim which helps with wind resistance and speed, whereas putters tend to be deeper and stockier with a very thick rim. This holds true for mid-ranges and fairway drivers as well with fairway drivers resembling distance drivers quite a lot and mid-range discs falling right in the middle. What is a Disc Golf Disc Made Of? One of the…

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