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Remedies for Thick Yellow Toenails



    Every editorial product is independently selected, though we may be compensated or receive an affiliate commission if you buy something through our links. Ratings and prices are accurate and items are in stock as of time of publication.

    From toenail fungus to certain types of nail polish, these are the causes—and how to get rid of—yellow toenails.

    Why are my toenails yellow?

    You might not pay much attention to your toes until flip-flop and sandal season rolls around.

    But you should because toenails that are discolored yellow could point to something more than an unsightly cosmetic issue.

    Yellowish nails are the body’s way of telling you something could be amiss, so don’t ignore them or just cover them up with nail polish.

    For the most part, yellowish-colored nails don’t pose a major health risk, but because they could be caused by a fungus or another underlying condition, a doctor’s visit is often in order.

    Here are some reasons why nails become yellow, plus the other ways your nails can change, and how to treat it.

    Reasons why your nails might turn yellow

    Toenail fungus (onychomycosis)

    The most common reason for toenails with a yellowish discoloration is nail fungus, scientifically known as onychomycosis.

    You might pick up toenail fungus from either a break in the skin near or under the toenail from wearing tight and sweaty shoes, walking barefoot in moist and warm areas (think locker rooms, public showers, and pool decks), or if you have athlete’s foot.

    Toenails fungus is rarely resolved with over-the-counter treatments. To effectively remove fungus, it usually takes several months of prescription medicine and medicated nail polish to be rid of the fungus for good.

    But not all types of toenail fungus cause yellowish nails. Two subtypes may cause yellowish discoloration, streaks, or patches on the toenail.

    Distal subungual onychomycosis is the most common of the subtypes. People with athlete’s foot are particularly susceptible.

    The fungus appears on the toenail as a yellowish, white, or yellowish-brown discoloration, or the center of the toenail might have yellowish streaks. Jagged or chipped nails may eventually lift from the nail bed, and there may be some pain and inflammation.

    Candida yeast infection is so similar to other forms of toenail fungus that it often requires additional laboratory testing to confirm it.

    “However, some clues that Candida may be causing the infection are distal and lateral involvement of the nail, complete destruction of the nail itself, or partial destruction of the distal nail,” says dermatologist Joseph Zahn, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at the George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, D.C.

    It targets the soft tissue around the toenail first, causing the area to turn reddish. It then penetrates the toenail, resulting in yellow, white, or even brown discoloration that can become brittle and split, which might cause partial or total loss of the nail.

    Nail polish

    Regularly wearing bright red and orange nail polishes may stain your nails a yellowish hue, especially near the top of your nails. Contrary to some information online, tea tree oil or Vicks VapoRub won’t clear up nails that are yellow from polish or any other condition.

    “The pigment can be removed by doing a longer acetone soak,” suggests Shari Lipner, MD, a dermatologist and associate professor of clinical dermatology at Weill Cornell Medicine, New York. Acetone, a powerful solvent, is the active ingredient in nail polish remover.

    Protect your skin first, and apply Vaseline around to each cuticle and the surrounding skin.

    Another option is to take a break from nail polish and let the residue grow out gradually. (Make sure you know about the toxins in nail polish and what they can do to your body.)

    Nail psoriasis

    About 80 to 90 percent of people with plaque psoriasis will develop nail psoriasis.

    “Patients with nail psoriasis often have thick nails, with the lifting of the nail, and little indentations called pits,” says Dr. Lipner. It often causes pain, impacting daily activities.

    “If the underlying cause is psoriasis, [with] the use of systemic treatments, the nail condition may improve,” adds dermatologist Pooja Sodha, MD, director of cosmetic dermatology at George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, in Washington, D.C.

    If psoriasis medication doesn’t help, treatments may include prescription corticosteroids, injections of corticosteroids, or certain retinoid creams applied to the nail.

    It’s also a good idea to keep the nails short and avoid trauma to the nails, Dr. Lipner says.

    If you think you have nail psoriasis, call your dermatologist. Nail psoriasis is stubborn, and over-the-counter remedies won’t help.

    Ram’s horns (onychogryphosis)

    Onychogryphosis, also known as ram’s horns, is a disorder of the nail plate growth that creates nails that look like the horns on a ram. “The nail develops an opaque, yellow-brown appearance associated with thickening, elongation, and increased curvature,” says Dr. Sodha.

    If you Google “ram’s horns,” you’re likely to see startling images of very long and curvy nails. These pictures are a bit misleading because it takes a significant amount of time for the nails to grow out that long and curvy, which only happens if ram’s horns are left untreated.

    Toenail fungus, secondary nail infections, and ingrown toenails might emerge if treatment is delayed.

    Ram’s horns tend to be hereditary. People with circulation problems, diabetes, and psoriasis are more at risk, as well as people who have a difficult time reaching their nails to clean and trim properly.

    “Initial treatment is focused on reduction of the nail thickening and curvature, which may be performed with drills, burs, and clippers along with topical treatments to soften the nail plate, such as urea,” says Dr. Sodha.

    Next, your doctor will treat any underlying conditions such as psoriasis, diabetes, or trauma to the nail.

    Yellow nail syndrome

    Yellow nail syndrome is an extremely rare disorder, with only about 400 medical cases reported, according to the Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.

    It typically happens to people over 50 years old but can affect younger people.

    Yellow nail syndrome is characterized by yellowish fingernails and toenails, lymphedema (fluid collection and swelling), and recurring respiratory symptoms. The nail discoloration varies from a pale yellow to a greenish color.

    The nail becomes almost twice as thick as a normal nail but generally remains smooth. Nail growth stops and the cuticle disappears while the nail eventually lifts and separates from the nail bed.

    People with yellow nail syndrome are at greater risk of developing a toenail fungus. Since this syndrome isn’t just about nails, treatment is focused on lymphedema, respiratory conditions, and any other symptoms the individual has. Often treating those symptoms will help reduce the yellowish nails and nail bed issues.

    If fungus is present, toenail fungus treatment includes prescription anti-fungus pills and polishes. Corticosteroids and oral vitamin E may improve appearance and malformation.

    Aging

    Yellow toenails (and even fingernails) can be attributed to aging.

    With age, nails tend to change in color, thickness, and shape. These changes are considered normal and do not require any treatment.

    However, if you suspect or know you have an underlying medical condition, it’s always good to check with your doctor first to make sure it’s not a sign of something more serious.

    How to prevent yellow toenails

    Spending a little extra time caring for your toes can reduce the risk of getting yellow toenails in the first place, especially when it comes to protecting yourself from fungus.

    And when you regularly tend to your toes, you’re more likely to spot trouble early.

    Here are some ways to ways to keep your toenails healthy and ward off injury and fungus.

    • Keep your toenails short. Long toenails are more prone to breakage and injury. Be sure to cut them straight across, rounding slightly at the tips. Rounding too much can encourage nails to grow into the skin, creating painful ingrown toenails.
    • Thick toenails can be more challenging to cut than thinner fingernails. Soak them in a warm bath first to soften them. Stir one teaspoon of salt per pint into the water and soak the toes for about 15 minutes.
    • Ward off contagious toenail fungus by wearing flip-flops at the pool, public showers, and anywhere where surfaces are moist and warm.
    • Wear properly fitting shoes and socks that breathe well. Fungus thrives in sweaty and warm environments.
    • If you have redness, pain, pus, or other concerns, call your doctor or dermatologist. Medical evaluation is critical if you have diabetes or other circulation problems.

    Next up, this is what your fingernail health reveals about your body.

    FAQs

    Why are my toenail tips yellow?

    Thick yellow toenails are usually caused by a fungal infection called onychomycosis. This can be irritating or painful. It’s less common, but the infection can affect your fingernails as well. Thick yellow toenails can be prevented by taking certain precautions

    (Get More Info)

    How do you get rid of yellow nail tips?

    Hydrogen peroxide goes deep into the nail and lightens the coloring, similar to the way that bleach strips the color out of hair. Mixing hydrogen peroxide into warm water and soaking the nails may improve the appearance of stains, and adding baking soda will make it even more effective.

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    What deficiency causes yellow toenails?

    Are Yellow Fingernails Ever a Sign of Vitamin Deficiency? Vitamin deficiencies can lead to a ton of different symptoms, but yellow fingernails are not among them. ?Some articles claim that deficiencies of vitamin B-12 and zinc can cause this, but that is not a common manifestation,? Maiman says

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    What kills toenail fungus fast?

    Effective products include efinaconazole (Jublia), tavaborole (Kerydin) and ciclopirox (Penlac). All require daily applications, and it may take as long as a year to see noticeable improvement. These products may work for early, superficial fungal infections because they kill fungi on the surface of the nail.

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    What lung disease causes yellow nails?

    Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is a rare condition defined by a presence of two of the following: (1) slow-growing, hard, yellow, and dystrophic nails, (2) lymphedema, and (3) respiratory tract disease.

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    Will yellow nails go away?

    Treatment: There is no treatment because the staining resolves on its own with time. To speed up the process, give your nails a break from use of polish, avoid acetone nail polish removers and soak your nails in diluted hydrogen peroxide (1part peroxide, 3 parts water) to help reduce the yellowing.

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    Does diabetes cause yellow nails?

    In some people with diabetes, the nails take on a yellowish hue. Often this coloring has to do with the breakdown of sugar and its effect on the collagen in nails. This kind of yellowing isn’t harmful. It doesn’t need to be treated.

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    What cancers cause yellow nails?

    What Are the Causes of Yellow Nail Syndrome? This condition is most commonly seen in people with the following: Conditions that cause lymph circulation and drainage problems like lymphedema. Certain cancers such as lung cancer, breast cancer, and lymphoma.

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    What autoimmune disease causes yellow nails?

    Disease at a Glance

    Yellow nail syndrome is a very rare disorder characterized by three features: yellow nail discoloration, respiratory problems, and lower limb swelling (lymphedema). In addition to being yellow, nails may lack a cuticle, grow very slowly, and become detached (onycholysis).

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    What medical conditions cause yellow nails?

    Yellow nails can indicate a problem with your liver or kidney, diabetes mellitus, fungal infections, or psoriasis, which need to be treated by a doctor. If you develop yellow nails along with swelling or respiratory problems, see a doctor.

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    6 Causes of Yellow Toenails & How to Treat Them – Buoy Health

    6 Causes of Yellow Toenails & How to Treat Them | BuoyThere are many reasons why your toenails may turn yellow. The most common causes are fungal infections and staining from the dyes in dark nail polish. You may also notice that as you get older your nails start to look yellow, thick, and brittle, and grow more slowly. This is believed to be caused by a natural decrease in blood flow to the hands and feet as you age—it happens to most people.People who smoke are more likely to develop yellow nails. It’s also more common in people with certain diseases, such as diabetes and thyroid disease. In rare cases, the discoloration is caused by a condition called yellow nail syndrome, which also affects your respiratory and lymphatic systems.Depending on what caused your nails to turn yellow, you may notice other changes in your nails, such as thickening, brittleness, and splitting. You may be able to treat these symptoms yourself, but there are times when prescription medications are necessary.Pro TipPeople often think that vitamin deficiencies can cause yellow nails. There is not much evidence to support this claim—do not worry about stocking up on supplements. —Dr. Priya Gimbel2. Nail polishSymptomsYellow nails after removing nail polishWearing toenail polish can cause yellowing because of the stains left behind by the dyes. This is more likely to happen if you use darker shades of nail polish, but yellow, orange, or red polish may also turn your toenails yellow. It’s also more likely if you do not apply a clear base coat under the darker shades.Treating nail polish stainsStaining from nail polish may go away on its own within a few days, but it can also last longer depending on the type of polish and the color.To help make the discoloration go away faster, try soaking your nails in a diluted mixture of hydrogen peroxide and warm water (3 tablespoons of hydrogen peroxide in ½ cup of warm water) or a diluted white vinegar solution (1 tablespoon of vinegar in 1 cup of warm water). Soak for 5 minutes and then scrub with a toothbrush to remove the pigment from your nails. Be careful not to soak your nails in pure hydrogen peroxide or vinegar as this can be damaging to your skin and nails.3. AgingSymptomsYellow discoloration of the nailsNail thickeningBrittle nailsIt’s not unusual for nails to start to look different as you age. It is believed that this happens because of decreased circulation to the hands and feet, which reduces oxygen flow to the feet and causes nails to become discolored, thick, brittle, and slow growing. Age-related yellowing usually affects all of your nails.Treating age-related yellow nailsThis type of yellowing is normal and cannot be treated.4. SmokingSymptomsYellowing nailsNail thickeningBrittle nailsLike aging, smoking causes a decrease in circulation to your hands and feet, in this case by causing inflammation and plaque build-up in your blood vessels. This causes your nails to turn yellow and change in texture.Treating yellow nails caused by smokingIf you stop smoking, you may be able to reverse or slow the progression of your circulation problems and improve the condition of your nails. If you’re ready to quit, talk to your doctor about smoking-cessation programs. But if you continue to smoke, yellowness and changes in nail texture will likely keep…

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    Remedies for Thick Yellow Toenails – WebMD

    Remedies for Thick Yellow Toenails Menu Thick yellow toenails are usually caused by a fungal infection called onychomycosis. This can be irritating or painful. It’s less common, but the infection can affect your fingernails as well.Thick yellow toenails can be prevented by taking certain precautions. If you have thick yellow toenails, you may be able to treat the infection at home.Nail fungus causes your toenail to become whitish or yellow-brown. Over time, debris builds up beneath the nail, causing it to darken. Nails can grow brittle, crumbly, or ragged.Toenails are an ideal environment for fungal infections because they are moist and warm. A fungal infection can also cause your toenails to thicken or become distorted. The fungus can cause unpleasant odors. These infections can spread easily and develop fast.Preventive measures keep you from getting a fungal infection or reinfection. Home remedies and medical treatments help stop fungal growth and let healthy nails grow back. You’re more likely to contract a fungal foot infection if you: ●Already have athlete’s foot●Smoke●Are exposed to wet areas often●Have a weak immune system●Have diabetes type 1 / 2, circulatory problems, or psoriasis (a skin condition)Repeated trauma or injury can also make you more likely to get a fungal infection that leads to thick yellow toenails. This usually happens to athletes that exercise frequently. However, it can also happen when people wear shoes that don’t fit properly or someone stubs their toe badly.Remedies and Treatments for Thick Yellow ToenailsIt’s common for yeasts, molds, and other fungi can enter toenails and cause infection. It’s important to practice habits that prevent toenail infection and reinfection.The following measures can help you prevent thick yellow toenails caused by infection:Wear sweat-absorbing socks to prevent fungi from forming in the fabric.Wear shoes in pool areas and locker rooms where you could come in contact with nail fungus.Shoes offer a dark, moist environment that helps fungi grow. Treat old shoes with antifungal powders or disinfectants.Wash your hands and feet regularly. Fungal infections are more common in toenails since your feet are in warm, moist environments more often.Trim your toenails and smooth the edges with a file. This will make it easier for topical treatments (like creams or gels) to reach deeper layers of the nail. Topical treatments administer antifungal agents on your toenails to stop fungal growth. A healthy toenail can then grow back. It takes time for thick yellow toenail treatments to work. You may not see results for months.RemediesBaking soda has strong antifungal effects. Soaking your thick yellow toenails in baking soda and water can combat fungal infections. Applying 100% tea tree oil to affected toenails twice daily can help ease symptoms.Olive leaf extract has both antibacterial and antifungal effects. Applying it in liquid form on infected toenails multiple times a day can combat a fungal infection.Coconut oil is an antifungal agent. Applying a small amount of melted coconut oil can help heal thick yellow toenails. You can purchase over-the-counter (OTC) antifungal nail creams and ointments. Be sure to clip and clean your nails before use to make sure the creams reach deeper layers.Laser therapy can be used to treat a fungal toenail infection.If your toenails do not respond well to OTC treatment, your doctor may…

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    Yellow Toenails | Causes and Prevention

    How to Treat Yellow ToenailsHave you ever said ‘forget it’ to wearing flip-flops because of yellow toenails? Yellow toenails can be your body hinting at a fungal infection or underlying health condition. Keep reading to understand the causes—and prevention—of yellow toenails. Why Are My Toenails Yellow? Yellow toenails aren’t always a big deal, but just to be safe—here are the leading causes:  #1: Yellow Nail Syndrome Named for the symptom, yellow nail syndrome is one of the more serious (but rarer) causes of yellow toenails. It isn’t just about nails: This condition is more closely related to respiratory disorders and lymphedema (swelling and fluid buildup). This condition causes pale yellow and green discoloration, severe thickening of the nail, inhibited nail growth, and separation between the nail and nail bed. Treatment includes targeting the conditions of causation. Yellow toenail syndrome isn’t a cause of toenail fungus, but it can cause a greater risk. #2: Toenail Fungus  Toenail fungus is the most common cause of yellowing toenails. Here’s where it comes from: A break in the skin close to/under the toenail from ill-fitting shoes; Walking barefoot in warm, damp areas (locker rooms, pool decks, public showers, etc.); Athlete’s foot. Unfortunately, toenail fungus isn’t often cured by over-the-counter medicine. It can take multiple months of taking prescription medications to clear up toenail fungus. The two most common fungal subtypes are distal subungual onychomycosis (the most common type) and candida yeast infection. If you suspect toenail fungus, seek medical attention.  #3: Nail Psoriasis If you have plaque psoriasis, you may be one of ~90% of patients who get nail psoriasis. If you receive systemic psoriasis treatment and your nail psoriasis persists, consult with your dermatologist. #4: Ram’s Horns Also known as onychogryphosis, ram’s horns’ nails look like what they’re called, and they’re caused by hereditary disordered nail plate growth. You can keep ram’s horns at bay with regular trims and cleaning.  #5: Aging It’s incredibly typical for toenails to change color, thickness, and shape with age—and, although you can’t prevent the cause, you don’t have to worry about any treatment either.  #6: Nail Polish Bright red and orange nail polish can cause some yellow staining on your toenails. Of course, this is no cause for real concern, and you can easily work to remove it with acetone.  How Do I Keep My Toenails Healthy? Now that you know what causes yellow toenails, here are some tips for preventing toenail fungus and injury: Cut them short, straight across, and slightly rounded at the tips to encourage healthy growth patterns and prevent ingrown toenails.  Soak thick toenails in warm salt water for fifteen minutes to make them easier to cut. Wear flip-flops at the pool, public showers, and anywhere surfaces are warm and damp to keep fungus away.  Make sure your shoes fit well and wear breathable socks. If you have any signs of fungus or infections, such as redness, pus, or pains, reach out to a dermatologist or podiatrist. It’s probably not often (or maybe never, until now) that you think about yellow toenails. But now you know what to do about them. If you believe you have toenail fungus or another foot-related ailment, you need an expert! Contact us at Foot Specialists of Birmingham, and make an appointment.

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    6 Causes of Yellow Toenails and Treatments That Help

    6 Causes of Yellow Toenails and Treatments That HelpEvery editorial product is independently selected, though we may be compensated or receive an affiliate commission if you buy something through our links. Ratings and prices are accurate and items are in stock as of time of publication. From toenail fungus to certain types of nail polish, these are the causes—and how to get rid of—yellow toenails. Why are my toenails yellow? You might not pay much attention to your toes until flip-flop and sandal season rolls around. But you should because toenails that are discolored yellow could point to something more than an unsightly cosmetic issue. Yellowish nails are the body’s way of telling you something could be amiss, so don’t ignore them or just cover them up with nail polish. For the most part, yellowish-colored nails don’t pose a major health risk, but because they could be caused by a fungus or another underlying condition, a doctor’s visit is often in order. Here are some reasons why nails become yellow, plus the other ways your nails can change, and how to treat it. Reasons why your nails might turn yellow Toenail fungus (onychomycosis) The most common reason for toenails with a yellowish discoloration is nail fungus, scientifically known as onychomycosis. You might pick up toenail fungus from either a break in the skin near or under the toenail from wearing tight and sweaty shoes, walking barefoot in moist and warm areas (think locker rooms, public showers, and pool decks), or if you have athlete’s foot. Toenails fungus is rarely resolved with over-the-counter treatments. To effectively remove fungus, it usually takes several months of prescription medicine and medicated nail polish to be rid of the fungus for good. But not all types of toenail fungus cause yellowish nails. Two subtypes may cause yellowish discoloration, streaks, or patches on the toenail. Distal subungual onychomycosis is the most common of the subtypes. People with athlete’s foot are particularly susceptible. The fungus appears on the toenail as a yellowish, white, or yellowish-brown discoloration, or the center of the toenail might have yellowish streaks. Jagged or chipped nails may eventually lift from the nail bed, and there may be some pain and inflammation. Candida yeast infection is so similar to other forms of toenail fungus that it often requires additional laboratory testing to confirm it. “However, some clues that Candida may be causing the infection are distal and lateral involvement of the nail, complete destruction of the nail itself, or partial destruction of the distal nail,” says dermatologist Joseph Zahn, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at the George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, D.C. It targets the soft tissue around the toenail first, causing the area to turn reddish. It then penetrates the toenail, resulting in yellow, white, or even brown discoloration that can become brittle and split, which might cause partial or total loss of the nail. Nail polish Regularly wearing bright red and orange nail polishes may stain your nails a yellowish hue, especially near the top of your nails. Contrary to some information online, tea tree oil or Vicks VapoRub won’t clear up nails that are yellow from polish or any other condition. “The pigment can be removed by doing a longer acetone soak,” suggests Shari Lipner, MD, a dermatologist and associate professor of clinical dermatology at Weill Cornell Medicine, New York. Acetone, a powerful solvent, is the active ingredient in nail polish remover. Protect your skin first, and apply Vaseline around to each cuticle and the surrounding skin. Another option is to take a break from nail polish and let the residue grow out gradually. (Make sure you know about the toxins in nail polish and what they can do to your body.) Nail psoriasis About 80 to 90 percent of people with plaque psoriasis will develop nail psoriasis. “Patients with nail psoriasis often have thick nails, with the lifting of the nail, and little indentations called…

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    8 Causes of Yellow Toenails, Plus Prevention and Treatment

    Here Are 8 Possible Reasons Why Your Toenails Are Yellow—and What to Do About ItParade.com has an extensive editorial partnership with Cleveland Clinic, consistently named as one of the nation’s best hospitals in U.S. News & World Report’s annual “America’s Best Hospitals” survey. Click here to learn more about our health reporting policies.Yellow toenails, while gross (to say the least) are more common than you may think. Often caused by a fungus called onychomycosis, yellow toenails occur in 10% of the general population, in 20% of those older than 60, and 50% of those older than 70, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians.And if you have yellow toenails, it can be extremely distressing. “Yellow toenails are very common. Many patients will become very distressed especially before a vacation or special occasion where they will be wearing open-toed shoes, go barefoot or be around other people with their feet exposed,” says Dr. Jackie Sutera, DPM, podiatrist and Vionic Innovation Lab member. “It can cause a lot of embarrassment, and many people just try to hide the problem and cover-up yellow toenails with nail polish, pedicures, artificial press on nails, nail extensions, gel overlays, etc.”Why are my toenails yellow?There are many reasons why you might have yellow toenails. Here are eight possible causes.FungusAs mentioned, one of the most common causes of yellow toenails is a fungal infection called onychomycosis. “Yellow toenails, thickening, odor, and debris that forms underneath the nail are all indications that you may have a nail fungus,” says Dr. Sutera. “You could have contracted this from another person, a pedicure, a hotel, a gym, a pool, or any public place where people are barefoot and there is moisture. A break in the skin or trauma to the nail will allow this organism to enter and cause fungus.”Related: 10 Home Remedies for Foot FungusAge“Being older leads to reduced blood flow to the feet,” saysDr. Mark J. Mendeszoon, DPM, FACFAS, and podiatrist at Precision Orthopaedic Specialties in Ohio.“It also accounts for more years of exposure to fungi and slower growing nails.”Sweating heavilyA moist environment is a prime time for fungus to grow rapidly in your nails, says Dr. Mendeszoon.A history of athlete’s footSince onychomycosis is typically caused by the same fungus that causes athlete’s foot, if you have a history of athlete’s foot, you may also be at increased risk for yellow toenails, says Dr. Mendeszoon.Staining from dyeStaining from artificial dyes in the socks and exclusive use of dark socks can also cause discoloration and yellowing of the toenails. “Using socks without dyes most of the time will help to keep your toenails bright. The superficial discoloration can be gently buffed off with a nail buffer,” says Dr. Sutera.Leaving nail polish on too longLeaving nail polish on too long can also cause discoloration of the toenails.  “Don’t leave nail polish on for longer than two weeks and give your nails a break from polish before reapplying,” says Dr. Sutera. “Also, try using a base coat, especially for highly pigmented colors like red, brown, blue, and black. This type of superficial discoloration can be gently buffed off as well.”Certain medical conditions“Some medical conditions can also cause yellowing of the toenails such as diabetes, psoriasis, jaundice, liver disease, cancer, tuberculosis, thyroid disease, and vitamin deficiencies,” says Dr. Sutera. “It is super important to have the underlying issue treated.”TraumaTrauma and bruising can also cause yellow toenails. “In most cases, this will grow out gradually with the nail and fade over time. In more severe cases of trauma or injury, the nail can be permanently damaged and discolored,” says Dr. Sutera. (scroll to keep reading)Related StoriesRelated: Do Your Feet Hurt, and You Can’t Figure Out Why? Experts Explain What Might Be Going OnHow to get rid of yellow toenailsFirst, your podiatrist may do a biopsy to determine the cause of your toenail yellowing.“There is something called a nail biopsy where a portion of the nail can be taken and sent to a lab. Usually, we cut off a small part of the nail, send it off and they can actually look under a microscope and do some tests on it to…

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    Yellow Nails: Cause, cure and prevention – LeSalon

    Yellow Nails: Cause, cure and prevention By Brid McNulty, August 8 2022 Just as it sounds, yellow nails syndrome is a condition whereby your nails become a pale yellow colour. This can signify many underlying issues – from something as simple as nail polish staining to more serious health conditions. We’ll outline some of the main causes and cures of yellow nails syndrome in this article. Of course, it’d be best if we never got yellow nails in the first place, so we’ll go through some prevention tips too. Bacterial infection or fungus Yellowing nails is commonly due to a nail infection or fungus. Nasty, we know, but it happens! Other symptoms of a fungal infection can include flaking of the nail and an unpleasant odour. If left untreated, the nail bed could retract, causing it to thicken and crumble. Curing Yellow Nails of Infection or Fungus The best idea is to get yourself to a dermatologist – not urgently but if after 10-14 days of at-home remedies, you haven’t seen any improvement then make an appointment. Not only will they properly diagnose you and treat your needs better, but prescriptions are far more effective than OTC treatments for yellow nails. Be aware that prescriptions will take weeks to months to fully bring your nails back to full health. Your healthy nail needs time to grow and replace the old yellowed nails. Before you run to the dermatologist, try some of these at-home remedies: Oregano Oil: It’s been found to have antimicrobial properties. If you’re unsure as to whether the yellowing is from bacteria or fungi, oregano oil is ideal as it treats both. Apply it to affected nails by mixing it with a carrier oil such as olive, coconut or jojoba oil. We highly recommend Zane Hellas Oregano Oil Softgels as an easy way to get the oil into your diet.  Tea Tree Oil: Another easy treatment you can try, and effective too – studies show that tea tree oil can stop common strains of nail fungus from growing. Just mix 1-2 drops of tea tree oil with a carrier oil and swab on the discoloured nail. Try MAYJAM tea tree essential oil to help clear up fungal nail infections. Baking Soda: Another common household product and an anti-fungal treatment. As fungus only grows in acidic environments, baking soda’s alkaline pH prevents the fungus from spreading. Soak your feet or toes in hot water mixed with baking soda will do the trick. After a few soaks, you should see your nails clearing up. Preventing Bacterial or Fungal Infections on Nails There are nail hygiene steps you can take to prevent nail infections. Make sure to trim your nails often and keep dirt out from underneath the nails. Wear fresh socks, and let your feet free to avoid toenail infections like athlete’s foot. Don’t use nail polish remover more than once a week on your nails. Nail salons can spread infections too through the use of unsanitized tools. Make sure your nail technician uses a clean or new kit. Stained from Nail Polish Removing weeks or months worth of polish can often result in an unsightly yellowish stain on your nails. Darker polishes tend to do the most harm, leaving nails stained with leftover dyes. Not the end of the world though! Curing Stained Nails Probably the best home remedy in the book: lemon juice. Soak your nails for 10-15 minutes daily in lemon juice until the stains have disappeared. Or, if you think your polish stains are just immediate, e.g. you’ve just removed yellow polish and see superficial stains, try whitening toothpaste. Scrub your nails with toothpaste using a nail brush. This should do the trick. Another at-home hack is baking soda and peroxide. Simply mix 2.5 tablespoons of baking soda and 1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide in a bowl. It’ll come to a pasty consistency. Using a cotton ball, cover your entire fingernail with the paste….

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    What can you do about yellow nails? – Wexner Medical Center

    What can you do about yellow nails? Author: Susan Massick, MD   Your nails can tell you a lot about your overall health. Discoloration, weakness and lifted nails all point to various illnesses that may be a result of the change in both your fingernails and toenails. But is all yellowing necessarily a medical condition that requires you to consult your physician? No. So, what causes your nails to change shape and color? Nail Polish Certain color shades and frequent use of nail polish and acetone nail polish removers can cause a white-yellow staining of the nail plate. This is purely cosmetic, very common and not harmful. Treatment: There is no treatment because the staining resolves on its own with time. To speed up the process, give your nails a break from use of polish, avoid acetone nail polish removers and soak your nails in diluted hydrogen peroxide (1part peroxide, 3 parts water) to help reduce the yellowing.Prevention: Darker shades are more likely to leave the staining, so go with a lighter shade and consider a protective base coat first. Fungal infections/onychomycosis Yellowing of the nail can indicate a fungal infection of the nail, more commonly seen in toenails than fingernails. The discoloration becomes worse with tight-fitting shoes or trauma to the nail plates and can be associated with athlete’s foot, as well. The most common fungal infection is from the Trichophyton family. Infection with fungus can lead to thickening and deformity of the nail plate, which leads to the discoloration of the nail.Treatment: Avoid moist environments and wear comfortable, properly fitted shoes. Treat any underlying fungal infection with an antifungal medication. Antifungals come in both topical and oral form, with the oral being more effective than topical alone. Because nails grow slowly, a systemic medication would need to be prescribed for three to six months in order to fully eradicate. However, cure rates with current antifungals are generally 50-60%, so you might need to repeat the course and still not have the infection fully treated.Prevention: Your dermatologist can culture your nails to determine the exact type of fungus and tailor the treatment according to what would work best in fighting the underlying fungus. Onycholysis Onycholysis occurs when the end of the nail plate away from the attachment begins to lift off the nail bed and looks white or yellow because the nail bed is now exposed to air. This detachment means that the nail plate is no longer sticking to the nail bed. Common causes include trauma, psoriasis, and as a side effect of certain medications. Onycholysis is commonly seen in certain occupations in which people work with their hands (butchers, food handlers and hairdressers/manicurists are common examples).Treatment: Avoid trauma to your nails, wear protective gloves, and avoid wet/moist environments and harsh chemicals to hands. Also, keep your nails trimmed neatly and avoid cleaning under the nails, as this can worsen the onycholysis and cause it to move further back on the nail bed. Prevention: If you’re taking medication that may cause or worsen the symptoms, consider discontinuing if the onycholysis becomes bothersome or painful. Psoriasis In addition to onycholysis, nail changes with psoriasis can include yellowing of the nails, thickening of the nails and pitting of the nails. Treatment: The best way to minimize trauma to the nail, systemic meds can help with underlying nail involvement. This is a condition where a dermatologist can really help guide appropriate treatment. A dermatologist can prescribe the most effective and appropriate treatment option. If psoriasis is limited to nails only, you can have steroid injections to the nails (intralesional kenalog injections). However, if there’s diffuse skin involvement and/or psoriatic arthritis along with the nails, a systemic medication is needed. Some of the newer biologic agents, such as Humira, Cosentyx and Taltz, can be helpful with widespread skin and nail involvement. This is where your dermatologist can target therapies depending on severity of the condition. Yellow nail syndrome Yellow nail syndrome is a rare systemic disease characterized by yellow toenails and fingernails, along with systemic symptoms, including respiratory breathing problems and lymphedema swelling of the legs.Treatment: Treatment is mainly focused on compression to help with the lymphedema swelling and to treat…

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