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Release Tips For Two-Handed Bowlers



    The ultimate goal of an efficient physical game is to reduce movement from the setup through the approach while maintaining maximum energy transfer from the bowler to the bowling ball. Here are some critical pieces of the two-handed physical game.

    The setup

    To better understand the setup recommendations, it is best to envision the body position at the top of the swing. This will help explain why I encourage the setup I do. Specifically, the key component at the top of the swing is shoulder alignment (via elbow alignment).

    With two-handers, the goal of the setup is to preset the body position to ensure the movement to the top of the swing is fluid and requires minimal change from the setup.

    To achieve the proper setup position, scaffold from the floor up:

    1. Set the slide foot parallel to the intended target line.
    2. Set the ball-side foot back and at 30 degrees. This will open the hips.
    3. Allow the hips to open naturally. The ball-side foot should be perpendicular with the hips.
    4. Move the shoulders to match the hip angle.
    5. The ball-side shoulder and hip are behind and lower than the non–ball-side shoulder and hip.
    6. Set the ball close to the body. The fingers of the non–ball-side arm should be placed just above the fingers. In addition, place the non–ball-side elbow forward. Think about making the forearms parallel with the hips and shoulder angle.
    7. Set the head to the outside of the body. The weight will shift to the back of the ball-side foot. This enables the slide foot to more freely move in the five-step approach.

    Maintaining the setup angles

    Recall that the goal is to move to the top of the swing position. As you move into the approach, it is important to maintain the angles established in the setup, including when the ball start is engaged. Too many bowlers open in the setup and then close the angles as they move into the approach. This creates additional unnecessary movement.

    Walk → ball → align

    With a five-step approach, the first step is simply a walk while maintaining the setup angles. As the toe on the slide foot compresses, this is a trigger to begin the ball start. As the ball moves into the swing, move the non–ball-side elbow to align with the back elbow. This will help to align the shoulders early in the approach. As the elbow moves to alignment, keep the head outside of the hip.

    Elbow alignment at the top of the swing

    Lateral trunk flexion continues to increase from the setup through the ball moving into the upswing. At this point, forward trunk flexion becomes fundamental to an efficient physical game.

    I strongly recommend a five-step delivery. This will help keep the ball-side shoulder behind the non ball-side shoulder for the entire approach, increasing fluidity. When and how the ball is moved into the swing start has a direct influence on forward spine tilt as well as foot speed. Ideally, the ball-side elbow should not move past the hip/stomach and the ball should move below the elbow as it is moved into the swing start to create a rounded movement.

    This will help to create earlier forward spine tilt which moves the center of gravity forward, increasing foot speed and fluidity. It also contributes to accuracy. The ball should move in a downward rounded movement (hand under elbow) as soon as the first step is completed in a five-step delivery. From the review of Osku Palermaa’s forward spine tilt, due to this rounded start with the elbow remaining on the body, the forward spine tilt increases throughout the approach in this manner: (articulated as a five-step approach).

    Step #2: 20 degrees

    Step #3: 36 degrees

    Step #4: 45 degrees

    Release: 80 degrees

    Lateral spine tilt is essential to becoming an elite two-handed player. As with many top one-handers, the head is outside the hip as the ball passes the leg into the upswing. From my experience, one simple thought helps players achieve a great lateral spine tilt position. Keep your head outside of your hip. You can see how early the head is outside the hip in the Osku Palermaa approach sequence images below.

    Osku Palermaa approach sequence
    Osku Palermaa approach sequence

    As you move the ball into the swing, move the head outside the hip as you move the non ball-side elbow directly in front of the ball-side elbow. This will help rotate the torso and set the stage for shoulder abduction into the upswing.

    At the top of the swing, the upper body angle should approach 45 degrees of forward spine tilt. Moreover, look for the placement of the elbows relative to one another, front-to-back. The goal is to achieve alignment of the shoulders, front-to-back. This establishes the opportunity to rotate the back shoulder under the front shoulder.

    Rotate the ball side shoulder under the front shoulder

    From the top of the swing, rotate the back shoulder down with the downswing. This will help maintain the head outside of the body. If the back shoulder doesn’t rotate down with the downswing, the non–ball-side shoulder will over-rotate and pull the head to the inside.

    Long elbow extension

    In the release to follow through phase, focus on extending the elbow past the knee. This will ensure maximum accuracy as the hand travels on the target line longer, while creating the largest distance the fingers will travel on the ball arc line (for rev generation).

    Physical game drill sequencing

    To aid a bowler in achieving these ideal body positions, I suggest implementing drills in a sequence from the foul line back to the setup. As I always state, body position is the most important cause and effect catalyst. By micromanaging efficient physical game movements, a two-handed bowler can improve their physical game significantly.

    The following drills are designed to work from the foul line to the setup. These operate as a sequential unit to build holistic physical game moments in the approach.

    Foul line drill

    The two-handed foul line drill is designed to develop key body positions at release to follow through. It also promotes a relaxed swing with elbow bend. Moreover, this drill will aid in developing a long elbow extension.

    Step #1: Walk to the foul line and place the ball on the ground, fingers out.

    Step #2: Set the slide foot at an angle (think 1 o’clock for righthanders or 11 o’clock for lefthanders) to prevent unnecessary stress on the hip and knee.

    Step #3: Rotate the upper body so the head faces the ball-side wall. Think about the elbow alignment process discussed earlier.

    Step #4: Pick up the ball, align the elbows front-to-back, elbows bent.

    Step #5: Swing the ball forward and then back, and then roll it. Think BEND (front elbow), BEND (back elbow), EXTEND (elbow moves forward past the knee).

    Perpendicular foot drill

    The perpendicular foot drill is one version of a two-handed one-step drill. One of the key characteristics of many two-handers is a perpendicular position of the foot as they push into the slide.

    Step #1: Setup approximately one and a half steps from the foul line.

    Step #2: Set the slide foot at an angle (again, think 1 o’clock for righthanders or 11 o’clock for lefthanders) to prevent unnecessary stress on the hip and knee. Place the ball-side foot approximately one foot back at around 80 degrees relative to the slide foot. Try to set the toe of the ball-side foot aligned with the slide foot heel.

    Step #3: Turn the trunk so the head is facing the ball-side wall. Lower the ball below the knee.

    Step #4: Align the elbows and keep the elbows bent.

    Step #5: Swing forward and back. Slide forward as the downswing happens. Have the shoulder move down with the downswing. Release and extend.

    Two-handed one-step drill

    The objective is to establish a top-of-the-swing position, swing the ball, and then finish.

    Step #1: Setup approximately one and a half steps from the foul line to accommodate a slide.

    Step #2: The slide foot starts at the heel of the ball-side foot. Specifically, the toe of the slide foot is setup at the heel of the ball-side foot.

    Step #3: Place the ball below the ball-side knee.

    Step #4: Be sure the body position enables elbow alignment.

    Step #5: Elbows shoulder be aligned and bent.

    Step #6: Start the ball forward and swing. Maintain the elbow bend throughout the swing.

    Step #7: Slide and allow the ball-side shoulder to rotate the back shoulder under the front shoulder.

    If this drill is completed correctly, the head will remain outside of the body.

    One cue is to think BEND, BEND, EXTEND. Specifically, think about maintaining elbow bend forward and back, and then extending the elbow long in the release to follow through.

    Top of the swing drill

    I added the top of the swing drill to the Lincoln Memorial University training program for two-handers this season. The goal was to help two-handers establish, feel, and maintain the body position at the top of the swing through the finish position. As with one-handers, two-handers can sometimes experience over-rotation of the non–ball-side.

    Step #1: Setup the feet in the same way as the two-handed one-step drill, one and a half steps from the foul line.

    Step #2: Rotate the body in the same manner as the two-handed one-step drill.

    Step #3: Move the ball to the top of the swing and hold at the top of the two-handed backswing.

    Step #4: The downswing and slide should happen simultaneously. Focus on rotating the back shoulder under the front shoulder.

    Skip drill

    The intent of the skip drill is to develop the feel of the rapid two-handed power step. I named it the skip drill due to the skip/gallop-like power step of many two-handers.

    Initially, this drill is difficult to execute properly. The key is the trigger point start.

    Step #1: The setup is three and a half steps from the foul line.

    Step #2: Setup as described above for the two-handed one-step drill.

    Step #3: Swing the ball forward, then back, and then forward again. When the ball reaches its maximum forward position, this is the trigger to start the drill. As the ball begins to move back into the swing, start the feet with the slide foot.

    Step #4: The tempo will be quick into the slide. The skip step of many two-handers is very quick.

    Conclusion

    By implementing a two-handed drill sequence training process, a two-handed bowler can develop a holistic physical game consistent with efficient biomechanics. Focus on executing the drills with quality and intent. Greatness is in the details.

    Credit: Joe Slowinski

    FAQs

    Is it easier to bowl two-handed?

    Learning the basics and just simply starting with two-handed bowling is easier than one-handed bowling but mastering the two-handed approach is way harder than you may think of. You will have to learn body positioning and the flexibility to master this approach, which is tougher than one-handed bowling

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    How do you hold a bowling ball with two hands?

    A two-handed bowler will use their non dominant hand to cradle the front of the ball in order to stabilize and support it during a backswing. As you push the ball forward, your supporting hand guides it to generate more spin during execution. A two-handed bowler can generate more spin

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    Why do pro bowlers use two hands?

    Two-handed bowling sure has its advantages. Using this technique, bowlers can obtain more spin, play different angles, and have more control over the ball. They also love this technique due to the increased ball speed and the ball trajectory. However, all players will not be able to master the technique

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    Do professional bowlers bowl two hands?

    When the ball track rolls over such a large hole like most thumb holes, it can jump up off the lane causing unpredictable ball motion. But a two-handed player does not use or need to drill a thumb hole and therefore could drill their finger holes in the middle of the CG and rotate the core as they see fit.

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    How do you become a better two finger bowler?

    Belmonte’s style looks more like it belongs at a golf course than a bowling alley. Traditionally, bowlers grip the ball with one hand by inserting two fingers and a thumb into the holes. He uses only the two finger holes. As he steps toward the pins, he rocks his arms back and forward, cradling the ball in both hands.

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    How does Jason Belmonte hold the ball?

    As he steps toward the pins, he rocks his arms back and forward, cradling the ball in both hands. He releases his guide hand first, then rolls the ball with his right hand. His technique enables him to generate more power and revolutions than many competitors, so the ball hooks dramatically as it approaches the pins.

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    Does Jason Belmonte have a thumb hole?

    Belmonte’s trademark style of keeping two-hands on the ball (which doesn’t have a thumb hole) through his swing allows him to spin the ball at nearly 600 revolutions per minute, at least 50% more than most one-handed pros.

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    Who has bowled the most 300 games in a row?

    Twenty-five years ago today, Glenn Allison bowled three consecutive 300 games, the first to record the feat in a sanctioned league.

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    What are the 3 most important rules in bowling?

    Keep your arm straight as you bring it behind you for the backswing, making sure it stays close to your body for the entire throw. Timing is crucial when you release the ball, and it’s recommended to let go just as your swing reaches its lowest point, near your feet.

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    Where do you look when bowling?

    Most serious bowlers don’t look at the pins, but rather at the target arrows that you will find on the lane. More specifically, there are seven target arrows that run across roughly 15 feet down the lane.

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    Where do you aim for bowling?

    While most people would believe that aiming for the centre arrow is the key to getting the head-on strike, it’s actually not the first choice. The ideal arrow to aim for is generally the second one from the centre, on whichever side your bowling arm is. This helps you get right to that pocket.

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    A Two Handed Bowling Guide – BowlersMart – BowlersMart

    A Two Handed Bowling Guide – A Comprehensive In Depth Look At The Two Hand Revolution – BowlersMart – The Most Trusted Name in Bowling Bowling is a sport that anyone can enjoy. You don’t have to be six-foot tall, or super athletic, but you might want to learn how to bowl with two hands instead of one. There are many benefits of bowling using two hands including the ability to use different types of balls and having greater control over your ball’s trajectory which in turn increases accuracy and scoring potential. If you’re also looking for the best bowling ball for 2 handed bowling, we’ve got you covered there too! Why Use Two Hands to Throw a Bowling Ball? Using two hands itself does not increase the power generated while using the technique, but it helps you smooth out your transition between forms and deliver a more balanced strike. Now in two-handed bowling, what used to take decades of practice and technique are thrown out the window as both hands are used to deliver the powerful spin toss and can gain you significant advantages faster. Mastering this technique will take time, practice and patience. In order to gain skill in this form you cannot just simply play in a league or expect results. To throw two handed, one must dedicate extra time and money to learn how to do it effectively which could be worth the payoff of your patience because throwing with both hands generates significantly more hook and ability to curve on shots that can cause controversy amongst other bowlers. Bowling is a competitive sport that requires you to toss the ball down an alley. The goal of bowling is for the player to knock over all ten pins with one throw, and this can be accomplished by using either your dominant or nondominant hand as they hurl the ball down towards them at speeds around 20 miles per hour! As you can see, there is a bit more to learn about two handed bowling than what most people might think. With that being said, this post will explore the ins and outs of throwing with both hands for all who want to learn how! Below are some quick tips on each different method before we dive in deeper: A Breakdown of the Two Handed Bowling Technique The Stance  A two-handed bowler will use their non dominant hand to cradle the front of the ball in order to stabilize and support it during a backswing. As you push the ball forward, your supporting hand guides it to generate more spin during execution. A two-handed bowler can generate more spin. Holding a bowling ball with two hands gives you an extra level of control and that translates into better performance on different lanes. That’s because, in order to produce enough power for your throws, it helps to have one hand supporting while the other executes the release rather than just relying on only one arm.” In order to accurately achieve a two-handed throw, bowlers will need to make sure they are in the proper form before moving forward. With two-handed bowling, you can find some similarities to one-handed bowling; parts of the initial stance is one example. To start off with your knees slightly bent and relaxed (not too much or else it might affect how high you’ll be able toss), have your feet placed on appropriate boards for aiming marks based on where exactly that ball needs landing. Your spine should tilt at about five degrees while holding onto both balls – not straight up nor down but just tilted ever…

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    Bowling tips: How to bowl 2 handed style efficiently? (Game Drills) | happybowlers.comThe ultimate goal of an efficient physical game is to reduce movement from the setup through the approach while maintaining maximum energy transfer from the bowler to the bowling ball. Here are some critical pieces of the two-handed physical game.The setupTo better understand the setup recommendations, it is best to envision the body position at the top of the swing. This will help explain why I encourage the setup I do. Specifically, the key component at the top of the swing is shoulder alignment (via elbow alignment).With two-handers, the goal of the setup is to preset the body position to ensure the movement to the top of the swing is fluid and requires minimal change from the setup.To achieve the proper setup position, scaffold from the floor up: Set the slide foot parallel to the intended target line. Set the ball-side foot back and at 30 degrees. This will open the hips. Allow the hips to open naturally. The ball-side foot should be perpendicular with the hips. Move the shoulders to match the hip angle. The ball-side shoulder and hip are behind and lower than the non–ball-side shoulder and hip. Set the ball close to the body. The fingers of the non–ball-side arm should be placed just above the fingers. In addition, place the non–ball-side elbow forward. Think about making the forearms parallel with the hips and shoulder angle. Set the head to the outside of the body. The weight will shift to the back of the ball-side foot. This enables the slide foot to more freely move in the five-step approach.Maintaining the setup anglesRecall that the goal is to move to the top of the swing position. As you move into the approach, it is important to maintain the angles established in the setup, including when the ball start is engaged. Too many bowlers open in the setup and then close the angles as they move into the approach. This creates additional unnecessary movement.Walk → ball → alignWith a five-step approach, the first step is simply a walk while maintaining the setup angles. As the toe on the slide foot compresses, this is a trigger to begin the ball start. As the ball moves into the swing, move the non–ball-side elbow to align with the back elbow. This will help to align the shoulders early in the approach. As the elbow moves to alignment, keep the head outside of the hip.Elbow alignment at the top of the swingLateral trunk flexion continues to increase from the setup through the ball moving into the upswing. At this point, forward trunk flexion becomes fundamental to an efficient physical game.I strongly recommend a five-step delivery. This will help keep the ball-side shoulder behind the non ball-side shoulder for the entire approach, increasing fluidity. When and how the ball is moved into the swing start has a direct influence on forward spine tilt as well as foot speed. Ideally, the ball-side elbow should not move past the hip/stomach and the ball should move below the elbow as it is moved into the swing start to create a rounded movement.This will help to create earlier forward spine tilt which moves the center of gravity forward, increasing foot speed and fluidity. It also contributes to accuracy. The ball should move in a downward rounded movement (hand under elbow) as soon as the first step is completed in a five-step delivery. From the review…

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    Two-handed bowling technique | Skilled Bowlers Many bowlers are unfamiliar with the concept of two-handed throws. Or, they consider it “granny bowling” reserved for those who are unable to generate power and accuracy with a one-handed throw. The truth is much different. In the bowling community, there are a growing number of two-handed bowlers who simply play better with the aid of their non-dominant hand. It’s tricky to throw correctly as a two-hander, let alone release a powerful spin toss that’s executed correctly. Lucky for you, we’ve put together this comprehensive guide about the two-handed approach. If you’re a one-handed bowler looking to change things up or a new bowler who’s just not feeling the one-handed delivery, we will help you get the right forward spine tilt and upper body control to make things happen with two hands! How do you bowl two-handed? Bowling two-handed is a great way to generate more spin with the help of your supporting hand. And while it won’t give you more power overall, it will make a powerful throw more balanced and more accurate when done correctly. Let’s look at the key factors needed to properly execute a two-handed bowling technique — from the back of the approach to the foul line. 5 Bowling Tips For Perfecting The Two-Handed Style 1) Use the same initial stance as a one-handed bowler. With your knees slightly bent and your feet positioned on the correct boards, you should apply the same rules to your bowling stance as a one-handed bowler would. Many bowling articles deal with the concept of the proper bowling stance. They go over everything from the five degrees of forward spine tilt you should employ to positioning your shoes to face your target. 2) Your second step is the key to moving forward with purpose. The first step of your bowling approach will mimic that of a one-handed approach. On the second step, though, you need to shift your weight to compensate for the correct positioning of your dominant hand. You will, in effect, walk around your normal swing pattern — using your non-dominant hand as a powerful guide from swing to back swing. 3) Enter your slide step with a plan, more speed or not. Bowling isn’t about breaking the pins. It’s about delivering the right throw at the right time and repeating that over and over again for maximum effect. Your final step, the slide step, should come on your fourth or fifth step. And with correct positioning and timing, you can affect the ball’s trajectory in a way that promotes spin and power. 4) Find the right grip for you and keep your elbow straight. Some two-handed bowlers prefer to slot their dominant thumb into the bowling ball and nothing else. Others prefer to cradle the ball with no fingers inserted. However you decide to do it, make sure to keep your elbow straight and your shoulder blades working towards your target. Keep your knees bent and your base strong for optimal throw power and technique. 5) Find your swing spot and go for…

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    Two Handed Bowling Tutorial (Plus the Best Bowling Ball for …

    Two-Handed Bowling Tutorial (Plus the Best Bowling Ball for Two-Handers) In the world of bowling, there is a controversial bowling style that is slowly but surely taking the sport by storm.Two-handed bowling is the new style of release that utilizes both hands to guide the bowling ball into a powerful throw with high revs (revolutions or rotations of the ball around its axis) and powerful hooks. While the throw itself does not increase the power that is generated using the technique, the form itself helps smooth out the transition between forms and deliver a throw that is balanced out better. In order to become a successful two-handed bowler, there will be some significant obstacles in your way. Mastering this technique will take time, practice and patience. In order to gain skill in this form, you cannot just simply play in a league and expect to see results. You will almost certainly need to dedicate extra time and money to learn how to throw two-handed. The payoff of your patience could well be worth it though, since this style of throwing is known to generate significantly more spin on throws, causing controversial viewpoints of its authenticity in the bowling community. What Is Two Handed Bowling? A closer look with bowling two handed style (Belmo Style)The common practice of delivery in the sport of bowling is to use one hand to toss a ball down a sixty-foot wooden lane, with the goal being to knock down the ten pins at the opposite end (preferably in one throw). Now in two-handed bowling, decades of practice and technique are thrown out the window as both hands are used to deliver the bowling ball into a powerful spin toss. Instead of using one hand to aim, spin and release a two-handed bowler will use their non-dominant hand to cradle the front of the ball a to help stabilize and support the ball during the backswing. As the ball is moved forward, the supporting hand is also utilized to guide the ball and generate more spin as the throw is executed. Due to the use of two hands, more spin is usually generated naturally through the throw. (Note: The second hand is not used to add more spin to the throw but rather to support the bowler’s throw. The extra spin is created naturally as the two-handed throw is executed.) When Did Two-Handed Bowling Start? Considering that the game of bowling is thousands of years old, two-handed bowling is a baby technique compared to the rest of the game. This style of throwing appeared in the American professional bowling community around the year 2009. Over the course of the following years, two-handed bowling has slowly but surely gained a steady following due to its supportive hold and high generated spin. An Australian by the name of Jason Belmonte is seen as the forefather of this innovative technique, his unique style of throwing generating quite the controversy in the professional bowling community. Another famous two-handed bowler that is making a name for himself in the world of bowling is Osku Palermaa, a Finnish bowler who has been steadily rising in bowler leagues around the world. These two bowlers are some of the key forces in getting two-handed bowling recognized as a viable stance and throw, though there are many who see this style as a disease to the sport they love so much. How Does Two-Handed Bowling Work? How To Bowl Two Handed | MAXIMUM HOOK!! In order for a bowler to successfully pull off two-handed bowling, there are several key stance points that must come together cohesively. Two-handed bowlers generate their power and drive through techniques used in their stance, approach, and throw. By utilizing these key factors together they are able to generate smoother throws with powerful spins. Stance: In order to accurately achieve a two-handed throw, bowlers will need to make sure they are in the proper form before moving forward. With two-handed bowling, you can find some similarities to one-handed bowling, parts of the initial stance are one of them. To start off you should have your knees slightly bent…

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    Two Handed Bowling Technique with Jason Belmonte and …

    Two-Handed Bowling Technique with Jason Belmonte and Oska Palermaa The two handed bowling technique is seen today in almost every Pro tournament. We can’t hardly watch bowling on television without hearing the two handed bowling technique being discussed or seeing it highlighted. There are two people presently who dominate the sport of bowling using the two handed bowling technique. Jason Belmonte from Australia, and Osku Palermaa of Finland, are the two most successful two handed bowlers. Osku Palermaa Osku Palermaa has been said to be one of the strongest bowlers in the world. He has be clocked throwing his spare ball with one hand at over 30 mph. His two handed strike ball is around 20mph. Why is this two handed bowling technique becoming so popular with the younger bowlers all around the world? Because,it’s simply just exciting to watch! The increased speed and extra revs generated, just explode the rack, and also generate more carry with the pins, which is basically enlarging the pocket for them. That is why this style of bowling is still very controversial. Jason Belmonte If you look at each frame of the panorama of Jason, you see he actually delivers the ball with one hand. Look at the next to last image and you see Jason has his left hand clearly away from the ball. Here is a match between Jason Belmonte, who throws the two handed technique and rival Sean Rash who throws the conventional style. See if you think the two handed technique has an advantage or not? There is some bad blood between these two bowlers, from words that were exchanged at a prior tournament that adds some drama to this match! Bitter Rivals: Jason Belmonte and Sean Rash Two Handed Bowling Technique The two handed bowling technique has advantages and disadvantages. Let’s take a look. Advantages Body Stress Relief Using the two handed bowling technique takes the stress of the one shoulder and distributes the weight more evenly throughout the body. No Thumb When they throw the ball for strikes,it does not require the use of the thumb. In two handed bowling, the opposite hand acts like a thumb to help hold onto the ball. However, two handed bowlers will use the thumb inserted in the ball for spare shots. The thumb, as we all know, causes a lot of problems in normal one handed bowling. Sometimes the thumb will stick causing the bowler to pull the ball, resulting in many errant shots. Or, the thumb will slip out too soon, causing the ball to drop prematurely. So eliminating the thumb altogether is a definite plus. Speed, Power and Revs But probably the biggest difference by far using this technique, is the fact that this particular style produces more speed, more revs or turn on the ball and power while at the same time maintaining accuracy. This style actually reduces stress on the wrist, because of the help of the other hand. The two handed bowlers would have a definite advantage on long and heavy oil patterns, just because they can generate all those revs, and strong hook on the ball.The heavier oil would also help in making ten pin spare less likely to hook to the inside too much, and cut down on misses there. The different PBA Oil patterns that the pro bowler encounter make for some difficult conditions Using the 2nd hand makes the ball more stable and secure than conventional three-fingered bowlers who bowl without a thumb. The arm swing is not nearly as high as conventional bowlers, so the speed of delivery is created in faster footwork, more spine tilt, and rotation and a strong slide. Disadvantages However,…

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    Release Tips For Two-Handed Bowlers – Bowlingball.com

    Release Tips For Two-Handed Bowlers **ALL ORDERS PLACED BEFORE 4 PM EST WILL SHIP THE SAME DAY – FREE SHIPPING EVERY ITEM EVERY DAY** Use and distribution of this article is subject to our terms and conditions whereby bowlingball.com’s information and copyright must be included. If you are a recently converted bowler now using a two-handed delivery technique, there are a couple of useful tips which can help make your delivery style an effective one.The best two-handed bowlers use their legs to get lower to the floor and reduce excessive amounts of loft. One handed bowlers typically flex their knees in their stance position and then increase the amount of knee flex each successive step until the sliding knee is flexed (bent) about 75 degrees. It is wise for you to do the same.Also, taking a long slide helps build a good foundation or platform by which to deliver the ball using two hands. Balance is an important factor for all bowlers and especially true with two handed bowlers.Your upper body should be tilted forward perhaps 15 degrees of tilt, and maintain that level of tilt as you walk to the foul line and deliver the bowling ball.The combination of upper body tilt and knee flex with a long slide will help place you into a good athletic posture, which will aide you in getting your ball to contact the lane surface much sooner and thereby reduce loft.Make sure you release the ball with both hands before your ball passes your sliding bowling shoe. You may be hanging on to the ball longer than needed and delivering the ball in an upward motion over the foul line, which will prolong the ball getting onto the floor sooner than you now are experiencing.Visualize your bowling ball exiting your hands at a gradual angle of descent into the surface of the lane, and not bouncing upon contact with the lane.These techniques can help you as a two-handed bowler to deliver your ball onto the lane more quickly and help you control your ball skid and overall ball motion.

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