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How to Wall Mount a TV: A Step-by-Step Guide



    One of the biggest advantages of modern TVs is that you can mount them on a wall, allowing for a more cinematic viewing experience and saving space. While this hardware feature isn’t new by any means, TV manufacturers are consistently taking advantage of the aesthetic option. With new gimmicky TV models and presentation methods coming out all the time — including TVs that roll up and down, and models from Samsung and LG that hang like works of art in your living room — there’s never been a better time to wall mount your next TV. But before you break out the drill and stud finder, you will want to read this how-to guide we’ve put together, especially if this is your first time mounting a new TV on a wall.

    Wall mounting isn’t rocket science, but it does require a fair bit of precision, care, and patience. After all, the last thing you want to experience is your new set lying cracked on your hardwood floor in a pile of crumbled drywall. Take a few minutes to read and absorb our tips, tricks, and expertise.

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    What height should my TV be on the wall?

    You’re going to be clocking many hours with your eyes glued to this TV, so the height at which you mount it might be the most important decision you make. While there is some debate around whether higher is better, the best position for most people is eye level, not looking up. Think about it: No one sits in the front rows of a movie theater because looking up at the screen is a strain on the neck and eyes. But it’s also wise to determine what “seated” means in the particular room your TV is in and how you’ll be watching it.

    For example, if you’re going to be watching the game sitting on bar stools or while playing darts or pool, you’re going to want to mount the TV higher than you would if you’re slouched on the couch binging your latest obsession.

    To mount your TV at eye level, take a seat as you normally would on your preferred chair, stool, or couch, and have a friend or family member measure from the floor up to your eye level, keeping in mind others that might be watching the TV, too (a couple of inches in height isn’t going to make a huge difference).

    This height is going to be where the center of your TV should be, not the top or bottom edges. Alternately, a good general height, according to Samsung, is 42-inches from the floor, which is roughly eye level for someone who is 5-foot 6-inches tall. Whatever height you decide on, though, take a piece of painter’s tape and stick it to the wall in the spot where the center will be. Then, have a seat and stare for a minute or 10. If it feels comfortable, then you’re good.

    The size of your TV is also going to play a small factor, as the height of the TV (measured from the top edge to the bottom) divided in half is going to be the center. If you’re mounting on the wall above a piece of furniture, like an A/V cabinet, you just have to make sure that you set the center to give yourself enough clearance above the furniture. For example, if your ideal eye-level height is 40 inches and you have a cabinet that stands 20 inches, subtract the cabinet height from your eye-level height, which will give you 20 inches. Then, take the height of your TV, say 32 inches, and divide that in half (16 inches) to get the distance between the center and the bottom edge of your TV. Since it’s under the 20-inch space, you’re good to go.

    What about viewing distance?

    If you haven’t already done your due diligence in determining what size TV you should buy, some of that decision will come down to how big your room is and whether it provides enough space for you to sit a comfortable distance from the screen, which will also play a role in determining how you arrange your furniture.

    To help you decide what is right for you, you can check out our handy interactive guide, but a general rule of thumb is to measure the distance from your seat to your television in inches and multiply by 0.84 (for example, 78 inches x 0.84 = 65.2-inch screen). This should give you the best screen-size range.

    If you have your heart set on a screen size already, however, there are several viewing distance calculators that show you the ideal sitting distance you need based on the TV size.

    What color should I paint the wall behind the TV?

    TVs, especially 65-inch panels or larger and today’s more popular models, tend to be the focal point of any room you put them in just because of their sheer size. When choosing a wall color to go behind your TV, just as you would when painting otherwise, take into consideration colors that will work best with the room.

    Painting with lighter, natural colors (beige, ivory, cream), for example, will not only make your room look bigger but will also make the TV stand out on the wall.

    With charcoals, midnight blues, and darker colors, however, the TV is going to blend in more when it’s off while also making it seem brighter and more vivid when it’s on, which many consider a more theatrical, immersive experience. If you don’t want to commit to a completely dark room, a good compromise is to just do an accent wall behind the TV.

    how to wall mount a tv stud finder

    How to use a stud finder the right way

    Electric stud finders are tricky little tools. They can be one of the most helpful gadgets in the box or the reason you put a dozen extra holes in the wall. Here are four tips that help ensure they won’t trick you.

    Step 1: Go slowly: To be effective, stud finders need to be properly calibrated. First, place yours on the wall and turn it on — you can usually do this by pressing and holding in a button. Let the stud finder read the density of the material (this will only take a second or two), then slowly move it from side to side. Go back and forth over the wall a few times, starting from a different spot with each pass.

    Mark each stud you discover with a piece of painter’s tape. We recommend finding three and using a tape measure to make sure they are the same distance apart. This will help you avoid false positives.

    Step 2: Popcorn texture defeated: Have you ever tried to run a stud finder across a ceiling with popcorn texturing? Not only do you ruin the texture, but the stud finder also doesn’t work well. An easy way to overcome this problem is to place a piece of cardboard over the area you want to scan. The cardboard gives the stud finder a smooth surface to slide across and will allow you to easily find the joists.

    Step 3: Don’t forget fire blocks: Before you drill holes, run your stud finder vertically up and down the wall to ensure no fire blocks are running horizontally between the stud bays. Fire blocks can make fishing wires down the wall very difficult, even for experienced installers.

    Step 4: Always double-check: Stud finders can be fooled fairly easily. They’ll often read a seam in the drywall as a stud. After you have marked your studs and where you want to drill your holes, you should use something to poke into the wall to ensure you actually marked a stud.

    We normally use a small precision screwdriver, but a cutoff coat hanger or piano wire will work fine. We would recommend doing this by hand, rather than using a power tool, as you will have a better feel for what’s inside the wall. You can also tap a small nail into the wall, and if you get past the drywall without the nail “falling in,” you’ve found a stud.

    The final step you should take before drilling is to poke a little hole to the left and right of where you want to drill and make sure you are still on the stud. This will ensure you are centered on a stud and not just clipping its side (and possibly hitting electrical wiring).

    Help! The studs are in the wrong spot — or there aren’t any

    You found the perfect spot to mount a TV in your home. You’ve read all of our tips on using a stud finder, and are ready to go. But after 20 minutes of scanning for studs, you can’t find any, the results are inconsistent, or they don’t line up with the holes on your wall mount. There are several solutions that don’t require much, if any, extra work to fix your little problem.

    Step 1: Take off covers: If you can’t locate the studs with a stud finder, locate an outlet on the wall (or any other fixture, like a cold air return). All outlets are attached to studs unless they were added after the wall was up (not common).

    By taking off the wall plate, you can stick a thin tool into the gap between the side of the electrical box and the drywall, and then feel which side the stud is on. From there, measure over 16 inches and you should find another stud. Keep going 16 inches at a time until you are in the area where you want to mount the TV. Then use a small tool to poke a hole in the wall to see if a stud is really there.

    Step 2: Make your own holes: What if you find studs, but they don’t line up with the holes on your wall-mounting bracket? Easy: Make holes on the wall bracket. The best way to do this is to use a step drill bit (like an Irwin Unibit) and a powerful drill. A good step drill bit will quickly cut through a steel wall mount.

    Step 3: Use a toggle: If there simply aren’t any studs where you want to mount the TV, then you need to use some sort of hollow wall anchor. These can be extremely strong, but as a general rule, they should not be used with full-motion or articulating mounts. This is because the force exerted on the bracket-arm when you pull the TV in and out can effectively rip the wall bracket straight off the anchors. The quarter-inch Snaptoggle is one of the best around, and a few of them can comfortably hold new 55-inch TVs on a single sheet of drywall.

    Mounting a TV on drywall or plaster without attaching it to a stud can be a very safe and reliable solution if you know the limits of the wall and the toggles. Professional home theater installers use these regularly. We know of other installers who overestimated the strength of the wall and ended up with a TV on the ground. In the end, if you aren’t comfortable performing the install, consider hiring a professional.

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    Please, hide all of the cords in the wall

    Nothing ruins the look of a nice television mounted on the wall quicker than a tangle of exposed wires. Luckily, hiding cables inside the wall is fairly cheap and easy. The simplest way to achieve this is with an IWPE (in-wall power extension) or a power relocation kit. These kits come with everything you need to run power up to your TV while hiding all of your signal wires (some even come with a cutting tool). You might be thinking: “Why not just drop an extension cord in the wall instead of installing an outlet?” Well, it’s actually against National Electric Code (NEC) to drop a power cord or extension cord inside the wall. It’s also not legal to put low-voltage cables like HDMI inside the wall unless they’re CL3-rated for in-wall use, which is one reason expensive HDMI cables are worth buying.

    You may not need the extra HDMI ports on your TV now, but you may want to add components to your home theater system in the future. Put in extra HDMI cables and run them through the wall now so that you have them when you need them.

    An IWPE is exactly what it sounds like — an extension cord rated to go inside the wall. In the end, you will have an outlet behind your TV, and what’s called an inlet down by the floor (at the same height as your other outlets). To provide power to the kit, you connect an extension cord from an existing outlet to the inlet. Confused? The pictures on this kit explain it clearly.

    Before you begin the installation, ensure your low-voltage cables are rated for in-wall use. The next thing to know about IWPE kits is that they come with a predetermined length of electrical wire, typically 6 to 8 feet. Also note that they should be used only in a single stud bay, and they are not designed for use above a fireplace. These limitations can be overcome or ignored, but we don’t recommend bending the rules.

    If you want to mount a TV above a fireplace (which we normally advise against), and there’s no electrical outlet above the mantle, we recommend hiring a licensed electrician for the job. If there’s a nearby outlet (floor level), they may be able to tap off the existing outlet to get power up to your fireplace. We also advise you to have the electrician run additional A/V cables for you. HDMI, coaxial, and speaker wire are never fun to run after a completed wall-mounting job, especially when it’s above a fireplace.

    If you can’t hide cables inside the wall, then try installing a paintable wire channel. Most of these simply stick to the wall and allow you to hide all of your cables inside, providing for a clean look. Just know that when you remove the wire channel, you will likely also remove the paint.

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    Choosing the right cable length

    It doesn’t matter if your TV is going on a wall or sitting on a stand — buy longer cables than you think you need. This is the most ignored piece of advice we give people. Extra wire can be wrapped up, stuffed in a wall, or otherwise hidden. If the cables are too short, you risk them falling out, simply not reaching, breaking, or worse yet, damaging your equipment.

    For a typical flat-panel installation, with a tilting wall TV mount and equipment located directly below the TV, 8-foot cables will work nicely. Twelve-foot cables will allow you to make connections before the TV is on the wall, or pull out the equipment once it is hooked up. If you’re mounting a TV higher than normal (the bottom of the average TV is between 36 inches and 46 inches from the floor) or using a full-motion mount, you’ll need 12-foot cabling. If that seems excessive, consider this: On a typical full-motion mount with a 20-inch arm, you will use 3 to 4 feet of cable before even reaching the wall — that is, if it’s properly routed to allow safe movement of the TV on the arm.

    A final note on cables: Try to avoid those with bulky connectors. These types of cables might not fit properly behind a slim television, or even plug in for that matter.

    Leveling your TV correctly

    Everything is cut, drilled, assembled, tightened, and otherwise wrapped up. You step back to take a look at your newly wall-mounted TV, but something isn’t right. The TV isn’t level.

    What do you do? Do you need to pull it down? Drill new holes in the wall? Cry? Cry really hard? Probably none of the above. There is almost always a way to level a crooked TV. Just know that sometimes a TV will never look level if the ceiling, floor, or mantle isn’t level (so be sure that your viewing angle isn’t deceiving you). Check these other areas before you go mad trying to level the flat-screen TV.

    Step 1: Put your back into it: Walk up to the TV as it hangs on the wall, grab onto the sides, and then try to force it into being level. No, really. Your success here depends on how snug the bolts are that hold the wall mount arms on the back of the TV. If they aren’t overtightened, you should have a little wiggle room to help level the TV. As a side note, if you do this and the TV comes off the wall, you did something wrong — so be careful.

    Step 2: Loosen, push, tighten: Take the TV off the wall, loosen the bolts holding the arms on the back of the TV, then push up/down on the arms as you tighten them back down. Put the TV back on the wall and see if it’s level. If it isn’t, then do the same thing with the wall plate.

    Step 3: Improvise: If you used up all of the wiggle room available and it still isn’t level, make more wiggle room. You can use the step drill bit we talked about earlier to round out the holes in the arms or wall plate. This may give you the little extra space needed — just don’t go too crazy and make the holes unusable. If you accidentally make the holes so big that bolts slip through, you can always buy larger washers.

    All of the tips listed come from years of firsthand experience mounting TVs on wood studs, steel studs, plaster, brick, from the ceiling, you name it. Some of them are common sense, but almost none will be found in an instruction manual. If you have the right tools, a few hours, and patience, then you can mount your own TV. Do be sure to budget your time appropriately, though. A simple wall mount (tilting mount, drywall, exposed wiring) might take a professional only 20 minutes from unboxing to finished install. A novice should plan to read the instructions, proceed cautiously, and free up an afternoon because, let’s face it: Breaking a TV is never fun.

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    FAQs

    What should you not mount a TV with?

    How to wall mount your TV

    1. Decide where you want to position the TV. …
    2. Locate the wall studs using a stud finder. …
    3. Mark and drill your pilot holes. …
    4. Attach the mounting bracket to the wall. …
    5. Attach the mounting plate to the TV. …
    6. Mount your TV to the wall. …
    7. Enjoy your newly mounted TV!

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    What is the best way to mount a TV on a wall?

    How High Should You Mount Your TV? Experts recommend keeping the middle of your TV at eye-level while seated. This is normally about 42 inches from the floor to the middle of your TV. However, this might be different for you, depending on how tall you are when sitting on your couch

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    Is it better to mount a TV higher or lower?

    Can I mount a TV on drywall without studs? Yes, you can use drywall anchor bolts such as toggle anchors or molly bolts. They can hold up to 100 pounds and secure your TV to the wall without needing wall studs.

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    Can you safely mount a TV on drywall?

    CAN A TV BE TOO HEAVY TO MOUNT ON A WALL? Home » Installations » TV Wall Mount » CAN A TV BE TOO HEAVY TO MOUNT ON A WALL? The answer is NO. There are brackets for all TV sizes and weight.

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    Can a TV be too heavy to mount?

    How do you know if your TV can be wall mounted? The majority of flat-screen TVs are designed to be wall-mounted. They are light and have holes in the back where the brackets should fit. Before buying a certain TV, check for a ?VESA? sign on it.

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    How do I know if my wall can hold a TV?

    Wire It Through the Wall

    One of the most popular ways to hide cords on a wall-mounted TV is to put them inside the wall directly behind your TV.

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    How do you hide the cords on a wall mounted TV?

    It’s not ideal, not comfortable and not conducive to long viewing sessions. Generally speaking, you want the center of the TV to be about eye level, or even slightly lower. This is true whether you’re mounting the TV or putting it on a stand.

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    Does TV have to be centered on wall mount?

    To get the best viewing experience, you want the middle of your TV to be at eye level, which is usually around 42 inches high. That means a 65-inch TV should typically be mounted about 25 inches from the floor to the bottom of the TV.

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    How high should I hang my 65 inch TV?

    Mounting a tv with a mounting plate.

    A mounting plate is a good choice when it comes to mounting a tv with no studs. Mounting plates help the anchors carry the tv weight with more ease and provide an opportunity to add more anchors, making it a more secure mount.

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    Can you mount a 65 inch TV without studs?

    Hollow-wall drywall TV mount installations are limited to total weights (TV, peripherals, and mount) of about 100 pounds. You’ll be able to attach fixed or tilting TV mounts but not full-motion mounts, as they can pull out of the drywall. Toggle bolts are the best way to mount heavy objects like TVs to hollow walls.

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    Can you mount a 100 pound TV on drywall?

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    Part of a video titled 5 genius ways to find studs in a wall… without a stud finder! – YouTube

    To get the best viewing experience, you want the middle of your TV to be at eye level, which is usually around 42 inches high. That means a 65-inch TV should typically be mounted about 25 inches from the floor to the bottom of the TV. Remember, the size of a TV is measured from corner to corner.

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    Can you still mount a TV without studs?

    Most TV mounts are designed for drywall, which makes for easy DIY products, but naturally requires the presence of studs.

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    Do TV mounts have to be on studs?

    While companies do advertise plastic wall anchors that can help drywall hold significantly more weight than a standard bolt, we do not recommend using these for the kind of TV mount 65 inch televisions would require ? as a 65 inch TV is most likely much heavier than even these wall anchors can handle.

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    How high on the wall should a 65 TV be mounted?

    1-1 of 1 Answer. The weight is 62.83 pounds.

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    How much does a 75 inch TV weigh?

    There are two basic ways to hide TV wires: on the wall or behind the wall. The simplest approach is to conceal the wires on the surface of the wall by running them inside something called a raceway, which is nothing more than a shallow channel that mounts directly to the wall.

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    5 Major Mistakes People Make When Mounting their TV

    5 Major Mistakes People Make When Mounting their TV Your dad never had to go searching around for the right TV wall mount. When he was growing up, your grandparents had a cabinet TV.  It was so dignified, sitting there in its wood case. There had a presence – it really occupied its place in the room. It was furniture. That old chestnut that dredges up memories of shag carpets and mothballs couldn’t be farther from the expansive, sleek, lightweight televisions mounted on our walls today, which provide exponentially more screen room with none of the footprint. Our TVs are part of the Internet of Things. You can watch in three dimensions. The only thing is that you’ve got to somehow magically conjure the TV up onto that wall. Sound like a challenge? You’re not alone. We’ve gone ahead and asked our pros, and below are five ways not to mount your TV – because sometimes you don’t want to learn a lesson the hard way.  If you’re neither handy nor an expert on mounting TV to drywall, don’t fret! Book a TV mounting service with Puls, and let our technicians tackle the process for you. We offer a wide variety of around-the-clock, at-your-door TV installation services, so you can enjoy your mounted TV without the necessary labor.    Use coupon code “TAKE10” to get 10% OFF! Location, Location, Location The first thing you want to consider when installing a TV wall mount is… well, location. There’s a lot to this one, from viewing angle and sun exposure, to where you’re going to keep your connected devices, to the location of the nearest power outlet (believe us, you don’t want to finish mounting your TV and then realize the plug won’t make it to the wall). Then there’s the issue of where all your cables are going to go – hanging cables can be an eyesore. It’s even a bad idea to mount your TV above a fireplace, as counter-intuitive as that might be. Don’t Go in Dry Unless you’re ready to risk your new investment hitting the ground and see how it fares, this isn’t one of the things where you just want to wing it. Before mounting your TV, you want to know what you’re doing and what you need. A drill, the proper sized drill bit, screwdriver bit, and a stud finder are among the required supplies, and if you haven’t been doing a lot around the house lately, you might want to brush up on how to use them.  Load Bearing Walls Speaking of walls, it would certainly be convenient if you could just drill a little hole into the sheet rock and hang that baby on up… but, you know – physics. Regular old drywall simply cannot support the weight of your new television, and despite what your friends might tell you, even if you use the world’s biggest anchor, it’s only a matter of time before humpty dumpty comes tumbling down, or whatever the kids are saying these days. Sad as it may be, you’re going to absolutely need to find a stud to hang that television mount, or find a wall made out of something more substantial. We recommend that you speak to a professional (or at least really trust the person you ask at the hardware store) about the specifics of your situation before hanging your TV mount.    Use coupon code “TAKE10” to get 10% OFF! Just the Right Mount The last thing you want is to go through all the rigmarole of installing your TV mount, only to find that you will have to pull down your TV every time you want to access the ports. Or that for several hours each afternoon, the searing reflection of the sun threatens to scorch your innocent corneas. If you’re going to need a swiveling mount, make sure you know beforehand. Conversely, if…

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    How To Install A TV Wall Mount: Tips From The Pros

    How To Install A TV Wall Mount: Tips From The Pros Now is the time to hang the flat screen television. Perhaps you have put it off for years, or maybe someone else put your first flat screen up, but now you’ve moved, so it is up to you. The first rule for hanging a flat screen is to remember if you are truly too intimidated to do this on your own, if the notion of trying to hang the television gives you cold sweats, then don’t do it. How To Install A TV Wall Mount If you are reluctant to hang the TV yourself, find a buddy who has hung a television before and convince him to help. Save the change between your cushions and hire someone to do it right. Whatever you do, don’t try this job if you hate the idea of doing it yourself. Someday a child may be under that television, and you do not want it to fall on him or her, or it might just fall on the floor, destroying hundreds of dollars of television. Avoid any of these scenarios and learn how to install a TV wall mount the same way professionals do it. Choosing The Right Tools If you choose to do the job, what tools will you need? A tape measure A drill and bits A screwdriver or screwdriver bit Level Pencil Stud finder (optional) Step 1: Find the Stud and Mount The first thing you should do is find a reliable place to hang the frame that will support the television. To do this, find the studs. There’s more than one way to find studs. One way is to find an outlet on the floor and measure over 16 inches, and that should be a stud. Another option is to use a stud finder. A stud finder is often relatively inexpensive, and as long as you take your time, it will work pretty well. When it says you have found a stud, you can find as unobtrusive a spot as possible to poke a finishing nail through the wall to ensure you have indeed found a stud. If all else fails and you cannot hang the television frame in studs, you can use drywall toggles. Before using toggles, you need to ensure they were built to handle the weight of the frame and television put together, not just the frame and not just the television. Also, ensure the drywall can support the weight. The height of the frame should have the middle of the television screen at eye level when you are standing in front of it. If for some reason the studs are not in line with the holes on the bracket, make new holes in the bracket. This usually isn’t too hard, and it is better than missing studs with the bolts that hold the mounting frame to the wall. Most mounting frames require four bolts that will need to be drilled first. Go slow and do all you can to keep things level, but if you are slightly off-level, there will be fixes later. Only for slightly off-level though! Step 2: Run Wires Through The…

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    How to Wall Mount a TV: A Step-by-Step Guide

    How to Wall Mount a TV: A Step-by-Step Guide Find out what you’ll need to hang up your living room TV. For maximum cool factor and a super clean look for your entertainment center, mounting your flat-panel TV is the way to go. Here’s how to hang that flat-screen TV up on the wall. What you’ll need to mount your TV Before you get started on your TV mount installation, here are a few things you’ll want to have on hand: Stud finder: Unless you want a TV disaster, don’t mount your TV to drywall—make sure you’re mounting to a stud for maximum support. Otherwise you could end up with an expensive mess on your hands. Power drill: You can try to mount the TV with a screwdriver, but you might be at it a while. We highly recommend using a power drill to speed things up for this project. Various drill bits: Carbide-tipped masonry bit: Use this to make pilot holes in the drywall, which you’ll drill your mounting screws into. Phillips head drill bit: This is what you’ll use to drive the mounting screws. Level: Don’t trust your eyes with this one—no one wants to watch crooked TV. Use a level to make sure your newly mounted TV is, well, level. This can help you avoid both a crooked TV and unnecessary holes in your wall. TV mount: Obviously, to mount your TV to your wall, you’ll need a TV mount rated for your model of TV. Check your TV manual for the VESA mount measurements and get a TV mount to match. And if you need help picking a mount, we’ve got you covered! Check out our roundup of the best TV mounts right here. Painters tape (optional): When you find your wall studs, mark them with a little piece of painters tape. This is much easier to see than a pencil mark, and you won’t have to write on your wall—that’s always a bonus in our book. A friend (optional): TVs are big, heavy, and awkward to lift. Unless you’re way more coordinated than we are, trying to hold one steady and line up brackets is a recipe for disaster. Grab a friend for best results. Don’t forget cable management.  You don’t want a bunch of cables and TV antennas hanging down from your TV. That’s a good way to ruin the whole sleek aesthetic you were going for in the first place. Fortunately, there are a few options for cable management.  Hide them behind a wall. You can route them through the wall or tie them together neatly and tuck them behind a shelf or other decor. Buy a cover. There are covers you can purchase that match the color of your wall, offering a simple way to hide cables. How to wall mount your TV If you have everything you need already, great! Let’s get started on the best way to mount your TV on the wall. Decide where you want to position the TV. Viewing angles are often important for achieving the best picture quality, so consider your location carefully. Moving the TV after the fact is not only extra work, but it’ll also leave useless holes in your wall. If you have a fireplace, mounting your TV above it is a popular spot for mounting since it’s generally a focal point of the room. Locate the wall studs using a stud finder. Move your stud finder across the wall until it indicates it has found a stud. When it does, mark it with some painters tape so you remember the position. Mark and drill your pilot holes. These are the small holes that will allow your mounting screws to enter the wall. You’ll probably want a partner for this….

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    How to mount a TV to the wall (like a pro)

    TV wall mounting tips: what you need to know before … – T3

    TV wall mounting tips: what you need to know before you get the drill out Join our newsletter All the best features, news, tips and great deals to help you live a better life through technology Thank you for signing up to T3. You will receive a verification email shortly. There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again. One of the great advantages of the flatscreen revolution is that today’s TVs can be really easily housed on the wall using one of the best TV wall mounts, saving you precious space in your living room.Almost every TV comes with its own stand, but modern ultra-thin models really lend themselves to wall mounting – a lot of the best TVs, and especially the best OLED TVs, are designed with this in mind. Done correctly this not only saves space, but also looks very elegant – it’s especially great if you’re looking at the best 55-inch TVs, best 65-inch TVs or above, since it can mean the larger size of set doesn’t dominate the room so much. So here are some installation tips for easily and safely wall mounting your TV.First, you need to establish where to position your TV. This might seem obvious, but people often mount their TVs in less-than-ideal locations. For a start, try not to install your TV opposite a window, because sunlight will wash out the image during the day, making dark scenes unwatchable (because all you’ll see is what’s out the window).It’s also not always great idea to mount your TV above a fireplace, though this is fairly popular. If your fireplace is tall, you’re somewhat straining your neck looking up at the screen. In addition, LCD TVs often have narrow optimal viewing angles, so you’re not seeing it at its best if you’re at a low angle. You can address this last point with a tilted bracket, correcting the viewing angle. You should also make sure the TV isn’t exposed to any heat from the fireplace below – we’d only recommend people do this with non-working fireplaces.What you really want is a wall that’s not bathed in direct light, and has sufficient space for the TV to be mounted at approximately head height when you’re sitting down. Where you sit is entirely up to you, but as central to the screen as possible is ideal.If all you have is a TV, you can then move on to the more practical aspects of mounting, but if you’ve got a soundbar you’ll need to consider where that goes relative to the screen. Directly underneath is best, and most of the best soundbars can be wall mounted using included brackets included with them.(Image credit: Samsung)Wall and bracket tipsThe biggest factor when it comes to actually mounting the TV is the wall itself. If it’s a brick, concrete or block wall then all you need is a pencil, spirit level, plugs, screws and a good drill bit. If there’s plasterboard attached to the wall, avoid over-tightening the screws or it might crack.If you’re looking at a stud wall, things get a bit trickier. Generally it’s best to avoid a stud wall when mounting a TV, especially if the TV is large and heavy, but it’s not impossible and there are specialist fixings for this purpose.Always use a flat bracket when mounting a TV on a stud wall. If you use a cantilevered bracket that can be tilted in different directions or pulled away from the wall, the weight of the TV…

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    How to mount a TV to the wall in 8 easy steps | Tom's Guide

    How to mount a TV to the wall in 8 easy steps Home How-to TV (Image credit: Shutterstock/Monkey Business Images) Learning how to wall mount a TV gives you the power to make one of the biggest upgrades for your home theater (outside of buying a new TV or a fancy sound system). And we’ve already found the best TV mounts. Wall-mounting a TV comes with a number of benefits, from a cleaner aesthetic design, to better ergonomics for more enjoyable watching.It’s also super affordable, with plenty of excellent mounting options selling for $100 or less. Whether you have a simple tilting wall mount or a fully articulated, dual-arm mount that provides a full range of motion and positions, the basics for installing that hardware are pretty much the same.From the prep work to the actual installation, here’s how to wall mount a TV, step by step.See the best TVs we’ve reviewedStill shopping: Our TV buying guide tells you everything you need to knowHow to watch birds using a security camera and a smart displayWhat you’ll needAside from having a TV and a wall, you’ll need to have a few things on hand to properly mount your TV.Paper template (optional)Pencil or masking tapeTape measureStud finderLevelPower drill with drill bitPhilips head or flathead screwdriverTV mountIncluded mounting hardware (screws, spacers, etc.)You’ll also want at least one other person to help. You’ll need an extra pair of hands to help lift and position the TV, and perhaps a second person to assist in getting the position just right.Some notes on handling TVsTake it from a guy who has personally unboxed and set up dozens and dozens of TVs – you need someone else to help you out. While smaller TVs can be handled by a single person, anything over 50 inches should be moved and lifted by two people. Even if the weight is manageable for a single person to lift, the size and shape of the TV make it unwieldy, and care has to be taken to prevent damaging the display. Mounting a broken TV will take all the fun out of it.When handling a TV, you’ll want to take extra care to protect the display panel. A large sheet of glass or plastic will naturally have some flex to it, but the underlying display technology usually doesn’t. Even a little bit of unwanted flexing or pressure on a panel can damage a TV beyond repair. (Again, take it from a guy who has broken a few TVs over the years.)To properly lift and carry a TV, you want to let the TV chassis do the work of supporting the display. Lift from the bottom of the set, supporting it at the side or top corners to keep the TV upright, in the same position it would be in normal use. This is the ideal position for the TV, because the chassis bears all of the weight and pressure. Try not to lean one way or the other, because the thinnest TVs can actually bend under their own weight enough to damage the display.When laying a TV down flat, lay it screen-side down on a large flat surface that’s covered with a clean, soft blanket or carpet. Any stray objects or debris can scratch the screen or bezel, so make sure it’s really clean! You want a surface that will evenly support the entire flat front of the TV, with no uneven portions that would place additional pressure on any one spot, or that would leave one side of the TV unsupported.Very carefully set the TV down on its bottom edge and gently lean it forward, lowering it down onto the soft surface, holding both the top corner and the middle of the side so as to evenly support the TV, being careful not to introduce unnecessary twisting or pressure on the panel.Get the right TV mountThe first thing you’ll need to do is select the right wall mount for your TV. This comes down to two major factors: what size bracket your TV will accept, and what style of TV mount…

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    How to Wall Mount a TV | Digital Trends

    How to Wall Mount a TV | Digital Trends One of the biggest advantages of modern TVs is that you can mount them on a wall, allowing for a more cinematic viewing experience and saving space. While this hardware feature isn’t new by any means, TV manufacturers are consistently taking advantage of the aesthetic option. With new gimmicky TV models and presentation methods coming out all the time — including TVs that roll up and down, and models from Samsung and LG that hang like works of art in your living room — there’s never been a better time to wall mount your next TV. But before you break out the drill and stud finder, you will want to read this how-to guide we’ve put together, especially if this is your first time mounting a new TV on a wall. Wall mounting isn’t rocket science, but it does require a fair bit of precision, care, and patience. After all, the last thing you want to experience is your new set lying cracked on your hardwood floor in a pile of crumbled drywall. Take a few minutes to read and absorb our tips, tricks, and expertise. What height should my TV be on the wall?You’re going to be clocking many hours with your eyes glued to this TV, so the height at which you mount it might be the most important decision you make. While there is some debate around whether higher is better, the best position for most people is eye level, not looking up. Think about it: No one sits in the front rows of a movie theater because looking up at the screen is a strain on the neck and eyes. But it’s also wise to determine what “seated” means in the particular room your TV is in and how you’ll be watching it. For example, if you’re going to be watching the game sitting on bar stools or while playing darts or pool, you’re going to want to mount the TV higher than you would if you’re slouched on the couch binging your latest obsession. To mount your TV at eye level, take a seat as you normally would on your preferred chair, stool, or couch, and have a friend or family member measure from the floor up to your eye level, keeping in mind others that might be watching the TV, too (a couple of inches in height isn’t going to make a huge difference). This height is going to be where the center of your TV should be, not the top or bottom edges. Alternately, a good general height, according to Samsung, is 42-inches from the floor, which is roughly eye level for someone who is 5-foot 6-inches tall. Whatever height you decide on, though, take a piece of painter’s tape and stick it to the wall in the spot where the center will be. Then, have a seat and stare for a minute or 10. If it feels comfortable, then you’re good. The size of your TV is also going to play a small factor, as the height of the TV (measured from the top edge to the bottom) divided in half is going to be the center. If you’re mounting on the wall above a piece of furniture, like an A/V cabinet, you just have to make sure that you set the center to give yourself enough clearance above the furniture. For example, if your ideal eye-level height is 40 inches and you have a cabinet that stands 20 inches, subtract the cabinet height from your eye-level height, which will give you 20 inches. Then, take the height of your TV, say 32 inches, and divide that in half (16 inches) to get the distance between the center and the bottom edge…

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    TV Wall Mount Buying Guide: Everything You Need to Know

    TV Wall Mount Buying Guide: Everything You Need to Know | Digital Trends Mounting a TV is a great way to free up space in your living room. If you’ve got kids who get touchy with electronics that they shouldn’t be putting their hands on, an out-of-reach TV will keep gooey prints off your new OLED screen. In terms of visual charm, mounting a TV is a staple of modern home decor. It’s aesthetically pleasing, especially with TVs getting thinner every year. Plus, they can go anywhere from a flat wall to a corner, and even above a fireplace (although we advise exercising caution when doing so). If you’re on the fence about mounting your new set, where it should go, and what mount you need, we’ve put together this guide on what to consider about your home before mounting, and what hardware you should be on the lookout for to get the job done right. What’s with your walls? Almost all TV wall mounts are compatible with drywall and come with all the necessary hardware you need to install, including bolts and drywall anchors. If you are installing your wall mount on a plaster or masonry surface, you’ll need some stronger hardware that won’t come in the wall mount box. (Not sure what type of material your walls have? Check out this helpful guide.) This may require a trip to the local home or hardware store to gather the necessary power tools and products. One other thought about location: We suggest you avoid mounting a TV over a fireplace if you can — check out this article for our thoughts on that controversial topic. Just as most TV wall mounts are compatible with drywall, all TVs use a standard mounting pattern, called a VESA pattern. The name is an acronym for the Video Electronics Standards Association, the body that decided what that generic pattern is. Basically, it just means that whichever wall mount you choose, it will be easy to attach to your TV. Size, weight, and flexibility When looking at wall mounts online, they will most likely be rated by the screen size of the TV they support and the weight they can hold, the latter of which is the most important factor. Different brands vary in weight even if the sizes of TVs are the same. If you are looking at a TV wall mount online, check the product description to see more information about the maximum weight and screen size it can handle. You can also find this info on the wall mount’s box. The next thing to consider is the flexibility you want your TV to have while mounted. If you want to be able to see your TV from other rooms, a good option is a pivoting wall mount. This will let you change the direction the TV is facing to optimize the picture on the screen, even if you aren’t sitting right in front of the TV. If you are mounting your TV above the average eye level (42 inches), you’ll want to invest in a TV wall mount that tilts down to improve picture quality. Fortunately, most mounts can tilt and pivot. If the TV can be positioned at the ideal height and you don’t need to access the TV ports on a regular basis, a fixed mount will simplify the installation and the TV will be close…

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